Course Offerings | API Study Abroad
Course Offerings

Highlights

  • Classes taught in Spanish and English
  • Internships available (for credit, additional fee)
  • Option to enroll in courses with Spaniards
  • Transcript from U.S. accredited institution (Suffolk University)
  • AACSB accredited business courses
  • International excursion
  • Apply early – classes fill quickly!

Requirements

  • Minimum 2.75 G.P.A.
  • Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Open all levels of Spanish speakers
  • Completed API application
  • University contact information form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • Official transcript
  • Additional supplemental materials
  • Entry requirements: valid passport with student visa

Dates & Fees

FALL SEMESTER 2017-2018
Aug 30, 2017 - Dec 21, 2017
$18,680
ACADEMIC YEAR 2017-2018
Aug 30, 2017 - May 12, 2018
$36,980
SPRING SEMESTER 2018
Jan 12, 2018 - May 12, 2018
$19,380
FALL SEMESTER 2018
Late Aug, 2018 - Late Dec, 2018
$19,380
ACADEMIC YEAR 2018-2019
Late Aug, 2018 - Mid-May, 2019
$37,880

Deadlines

FALL SEMESTER 2017-2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
May 1, 2017
PAYMENT DEADLINE
May 15, 2017
ACADEMIC YEAR 2017-2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
May 1, 2017
PAYMENT DEADLINE
May 15, 2017
SPRING SEMESTER 2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Oct 15, 2017
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Nov 1, 2017
FALL SEMESTER 2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
May 1, 2018
PAYMENT DEADLINE
May 15, 2018
ACADEMIC YEAR 2018-2019
APPLICATION DEADLINE
May 1, 2018
PAYMENT DEADLINE
May 15, 2018

Course Offerings

If you require syllabi that are not listed below, please contact your API Program Coordinator.

 

INTERNSHIP OPTION

Internship in Local Companies (3-4)
  • 5 semesters of Spanish
  • Placements vary per course/department
  • Within 45 minute commute of city center
  • Deadlines earlier than academic program – apply early
  • Spring: October 1
  • Fall: April 25
API students participating in the Suffolk University Madrid program have the opportunity to participate in a credit-bearing internship to complement their academic studies. Placements are available in a variety of fields, including: global business, communications and journalism, economics, government, history, management, marketing, philosophy (applied ethics), psychology, sociology, theater, science, and women’s and gender studies. Students must have a high level of Spanish language proficiency (minimum 5 semesters), as all placements are in Spanish businesses/organizations. The deadlines for the internships are earlier than the regular academic program, so students are encouraged to apply early. These internships are offered for an additional fee. Contact the API office for more information.

SPRING

[click here for Syllabus PDF]

BUSINESS

ACCT 202 Accounting and Decision Making II (3) – Conducted in English

This course helps students apply the concepts and skills from the preceding course (ACCT 201). Students learn how to analyze the financial condition and performance of a firm, and how to use accounting information in business planning, decision-making and control. Relevant current ethical and competitive issues found in the financial press are discussed in the course.

BLE 215 Business Ethics and Law (3) – Conducted in English

This course deals with the roles and responsibilities of business in a global society; teaches models of ethical decision making that incorporate multiple points of view, including diverse cultural world views and legal perspectives; and addresses those factors that contribute to and constrain ethical behavior in and by organizations. Students then apply these concepts to current business problems, such as anti-trust, accounting fraud, deceptive advertising, and environmental dumping.

SIB 321 Introduction to International Business (3) – Conducted in English

This course provides students with an understanding of the problems and opportunities associated with doing business across national and cultural boundaries and encourages global business thinking by focusing on economic, social, cultural, and political conditions, national and multinational regulations of international transactions and investments, and global strategies for business operations.

COMMUNICATIONS & JOURNALISM

CJN 216 Intercultural Communication (4) – Conducted in English

This course analyzes the principles of human communication and applies them as tools in the study of how members of different cultures perceive and communicate with each other and in the analysis of communication within cultures and their subgroups. All aspects of interpersonal communication – verbal, paralingual and nonverbal – are considered. The course also includes a historical analysis of the formation of world views that influence the communication between different cultures and subgroups. The reflection of such world views in film, literature and the media will be discussed. The course also includes a historical analysis of the formation of world views that influence the communication between different cultures and subgroups. The reflection of such world views in film, literature and the media will be discussed.

ECONOMICS

EC 101 Principles of Economics Microeconomics (4) – Conducted in English

This course provides an introduction to the organization and operation of a market economy with a focus on how it allocates scarce resources; the analysis of consumer demand and profit maximizing behavior of business; examination of pricing and output decisions under conditions of competition, monopoly and imperfect competition; and analysis of markets for labor and capital. Policy issues also covered include price ceiling and floor, and competition and monopoly.

EC 102 Principles of Economics Macroeconomics (4) – Conducted in English

This course covers the following topics: an introduction to the theory of income determination, national income analysis and international trade; the role of labor and capital in aggregate economic activity; problems of unemployment and inflation; functioning and impact of the monetary system; monetary and fiscal policies for economic stabilization; international transactions and their influence on the domestic economy; and U.S. balance of trade deficits and exchange rate fluctuations.

GOVERNMENT

GVT 261 Theory and Practice of International Relations (4) – Conducted in English

Theory and practice in IR are often too disconnected. First half of the semester will be devoted to Theories of IR while second half will apply theory to reality. Special attention to the use of force and conflict resolution, as well as to the changes in the international agenda following the end of the Cold War and the appearance of new global actors.

GVT 281 Introduction to Comparative Politics (4) – Conducted in English

This course introduces students to some of the main theories, concepts, approaches, and methods in comparative politics. The main theme concerns the different paths of capitalist development and political democratization. We will explore the development of political and economic evolution, with particular attention to important theories, ideas, ideologies, leaders, and political institutions that have played in shaping both nation’s historical past and their dynamic present. Closely linked to this are the historical and contemporary practices of cultural, economic, societal and foreign relations. We will also be concerned with the ways in which scholars have written about different passages of economic and political development. Throughout the semester, we will consider the study of Comparative Politics as it relates to current events. We will trace the increasingly close relationships between countries. By engaging with the comparison of disparate paths of economic and political development, we will be familiar with how both national and global economic transformations shape the domestic politics and, arguably, vice-versa. We will come to understand some of the key features that shaped what is becoming increasingly integrated world of disparate governments.

GVT 439 Global Environmental Threats in the 21st Century (4) – Conducted in English

This course provides students with an overview of the major environmental problems from a scientific, economic, political, social and ethical perspective. It also focuses on how governmental institutions, non-governmental organizations and various business corporations determine the importance of enhancing the concept of conservation of nature and the protection of the planet’s biodiversity, by searching to interconnect political, economic, social and natural systems with the aid of international environmental policies, that started with the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment, in 1972, up to the recent negotiations discussed in the Copenhagen Treaty in 2009, knowing that the first step lies in the field of Environmental Education, in order to increase awareness of the need of establishing a sustainable lifestyle in the 21st Century.

HISTORY AND ART OF CINEMA

ART/SPAN 333E Film Nations: Comparative Perspectives on Spanish and U.S. Cinema (4) – Conducted in English

This course is aimed at establishing the points of convergence and divergence between the history, aesthetics, and social significance of film production in Spain and the United States. It will address issues such as the political economy of American vs. Spanish cinema, film as a social and cultural indicator, audience reception and Spanish and American cinema at the crossroads with other arts and cultural discourses. The course includes in-class lectures and screenings, film discussions, written assignments and exams, and a field research (*small group work) on a topic to be discussed with your professor.

COMM/ART 341E Spanish Identity: Film, Advertising and Pop Music (4)  Conducted in English

The main objective of this course is to provide an overview of the social representations of the Spanish identity developed during the democratic period from different areas of the arts and the new and old mass media. We will start with the analysis and commentary of a set of artistic works and media practices understood as expressions of “social creativity.” The analyses will prove the existence in these works of speeches and counter-discourses that have contributed to building and renegotiating the Spanish identity in the democratic era.

HISTORY

HST 150 Empires & Globalization in World History II (4) – Conducted in English

This course provides a survey of the most transcendental developments in World History, focusing on events or themes that have been moved by global forces, or that have had great impact on the collective history of mankind. Emphasis is given to the birth and maturity of the world’s great empires and civilizations and the relationships between empire-building, the interaction between the world’s diverse peoples and societies and the early manifestations of the process of globalization, from the dawn of civilization to the Late Middle Ages.

HST 414 Nazi Germany (4) – Conducted in English

This course examines the following topics: German and European preconditions; the Versailles Treaty and the failure of the Weimar Republic; Hitler’s ideas, collaborators and institutions; Nazi foreign and domestic policy; World War II and the concentration camps.

HUMANITIES

ARH 102 Art History II (4) – Conducted in English

This course provides a survey of European and American art from the 16th to the 20th centuries. Works of painting, sculpture, and architecture are presented in their historical context. The course covers the High-Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Neoclassicism, Cubism, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop, and Post-Modernism. Many classes are held in the world-famous Prado and Reina Sofia Museums. There is an additional fee for portions of this course. Contact the API office for details.

MATHEMATICS

MATH 134 Calculus for Management & Social Sciences (4) – Conducted in English

This course provides an introduction to differential and integral calculus. Theory is presented informally and topics and techniques are limited to polynomials, rational functions, logarithmic and exponential functions. (This course cannot be used to satisfy core or complementary requirements by students majoring in biology, chemistry, computer science, engineering, mathematics or physics.)

STATS 250 Applied Statistics (4) – Conducted in English

This course presents an application of statistical analysis to real-world business and economic problems. Topics include data presentation, descriptive statistics including measures of location and dispersion, introduction to probability, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions, sampling and sampling distributions, statistical inference including estimation and hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression analyses.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 115 Introduction to Philosophy (4) – Conducted in English

This course provides a general introduction to the nature of philosophical analysis. Lectures, readings, and discussions focus on representative issues and thinkers from the main areas of philosophy (such as the nature of truth, reality, morality, politics, and religion).

SCIENCE

CHEM 112/L112 General Chemistry II with Lab (4) – Conducted in English

This course continues the discussion of the fundamental principles of chemistry. Topics include: introductions to solutions; kinetics; equilibrium; acid-base systems; thermodynamics; and electrochemistry.

SCI 111/L111 Astronomy I with Lab (4) – Conducted in English

Topics include: history of astronomy from the ancients to Newton; light; telescopes; sun; earth; moon; planets; comets; asteroids; meteors; space programs; science and technology in society. For non-science majors. There is an additional fee for the lab portion of this course, which takes place at an observatory in the Canary Islands. Contact the API office for details.

SCI 171 The Built World: How Humans Engineer Environment (4) – Conducted in English

The most basic needs of humans have not changed – water, food, and shelter – but the means of meeting these needs has. In this course, we will examine how technology-driven societies operate by studying how cities are built and how they function. Topics will include water supply and distribution systems; transportation systems (including road and bridge design and construction); building design, construction, and operation (including skyscraper and sustainable building design), and waste removal systems (municipal and industrial wastewater removal and treatment, solid waste removal and treatment). This is not a course about little gadgets and widgets; this is a course about big engineering marvels; and it emphasizes applications of science – how things work – rather than scientific theory.

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 224 Families in Contemporary Society (Spain) (4) – Conducted in English

This course provides an exploration of the diversity of contemporary families. Comparisons are made between the cultural myths of the ideal family and the lived realities. Challenges confronting contemporary families and their implications for social policy are examined in such areas as work/family conflicts, gay and lesbian families, welfare and family violence.

SOC 228 Cultural Diversity & Human Needs (4) – Conducted in English

The course enables students to examine, as well as develop an awareness and appreciation of, diversity within today’s society. Providing an overview of the major racial, ethnic and cultural groups in the US, the focus is on the ways in which cultural awareness enhances professional helping relationships and improves the operation of human services systems.

SOC 379 Anthropological Perspectives on Spain (4) – Conducted in English

This course explores the social dynamics and historical background of contemporary Spanish society. Students will contextualize events happening around them — for example, the present Catalan independence drive — by developing their understanding of Spain’s history and the country’s past and present social dynamics. The course draws widely on the disciplines of anthropology and sociology, history and political science, and places a strong emphasis on films as texts. Students also regularly read and comment upon the news media, linking current events to readings and class discussions. The first part of the course explores Spain’s 20th-century history: the Civil War and Franco regime, and how this period is remembered today. We then examine the impacts of the Franco era on aspects of contemporary Spain, from pop culture to political protests. We explore current debates surrounding socioeconomic inequality; gender roles; integration of immigrants; and the influence of the Church; among others. Finally, we ask what it means to be Spanish in the multicultural and multilingual reality of the country today, and we discuss the future of a Spanish national identity in light of recent events.

SPANISH

SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish I (4) – Conducted in Spanish

Students in this course practice their oral and written language skills. Class activities are organized around cultural themes that reflect the diversity of the Hispanic world.

SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish II (4) – Conducted in Spanish

Students in this course practice their oral and written language skills. Class activities are organized around cultural themes that reflect the diversity of the Hispanic world.

SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I (4) – Conducted in Spanish

This course provides a systematic review of Spanish grammar and studies of Spanish through texts of cultural interest. Students develop written and oral skills through compositions and audio-visual materials.

SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II (4) – Conducted in Spanish

This course provides a systematic review of Spanish grammar and studies of Spanish through texts of cultural interest. Students develop written and oral skills through compositions and audio-visual materials.

SPAN 210/I210 Spanish in the Workplace/Internship Module (4) – Conducted in Spanish

Through a systematic review of grammar, a diversity of readings, and oral as well as written work, students will increase their lexical and grammatical knowledge of Spanish language specific to the workplace in order to communicate more easily and comfortably. Students will also be better prepared to deal with the specific themes related to business introduced in the course. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or appropriate score on Spanish Placement Exam.

SPAN 290 Advanced Conversation and Composition (4) – Conducted in Spanish

This course aims to build vocabulary, normalize pronunciation, review Spanish syntax, and provide extensive writing practice and development of conversational skills through group discussions on subjects of interest to students enrolled.

SPAN 350 Spanish Cultural Studies (4) – Conducted in English

This is an interdisciplinary course, focusing on fundamentally important themes in the development of Spanish culture. This course includes field trips, lectures, and visits to the theater and cinema.

SPAN 360 Madrid: A Cosmopolitan City (4) – Conducted in Spanish

This course is designed to provide students with a basic knowledge of the city of Madrid in terms of its historical, cultural, and social development. Contemporary aspects of the city such as its rise to prominence amongst the capitals of Europe and the phenomenon of recent immigration patterns are also discussed. Students who enroll in this course should have completed SPAN 201. Specific grammar points are reviewed as needed. There is an additional fee for the cultural visits as part of this course. Contact the API office for details.

SPAN 410 Spanish Cinema (4) – Conducted in Spanish and English

This course offers the students a panoramic view of the most representative Spanish films from the 1950s until today, with special emphasis on its social, political, artistic and cultural context. Films will be viewed in Spanish with English subtitles. Conducted in English, the course will be open to both non-majors in Spanish as well as to advanced-level Spanish majors and minors, with the latter carrying out their written work and individual meetings with the instructor in Spanish.

SPANISH CULTURE

SPAN 350 Spanish Language and its Varieties (4) – Conducted in Spanish

Students acquire an extensive knowledge about the variety of Spanish language in its geographical, social and situational dimension, as well as its historical development through the study and analysis of all types of words, oral and written, current and those of other time periods.

FALL
[click here for Syllabus PDF]

BUSINESS

ACCT 201 Accounting & Decision Making I (3) – Conducted in English

This is the first of two sequence courses designed to provide a user of accounting information with the skills to appraise and manage a business. Students are introduced to the accounting cycle, the financial statements, and the theory underlying accounting as information. The course addresses current accounting topics, including relevant ethical and international issues found in the financial press.

BLE 214 Principles of Business Law (3) – Conducted in English

This course offers students an introduction to the field of business law including an overview of the organization and operation of the American legal system, and the court system and legal procedure, together with brief coverage of selected business law topics such as contracts as examples of the legal system in practice. Particular attention is given to the ways in which business law manifests important social and ethical precepts.

SIB 321 Introduction to International Business (3) – Conducted in English

This course provides students with an understanding of the problems and opportunities associated with doing business across national and cultural boundaries and encourages global business thinking by focusing on economic, social, cultural, and political conditions, national and multinational regulations of international transactions and investments, and global strategies for business operations.

SBS 100 CareerSTART (1) – Conducted in English

This course engages students in a series of activities, discussions, and programs on campus to explore their interests and strengths and learn how courses and co-curricular experiences together help them achieve their goals. Students also develop innovation, team, and presentation skills, get involved on campus, and learn about campus resources and services that aid in a successful college experience. This is the first in a four-year sequence of career courses

SBS 101 Business Foundations (3) – Conducted in English

This course offers a broad introduction to business organization and business leadership using the Harvard case study method and group presentations of case analyses to real executives. Introduction to major functional areas of business including accounting, finance, marketing, operations, organizational behavior, business ethics, strategic management, and leadership. Class participation is a crucial component of the course.

SBS 200 CareerExplore (1) – Conducted in English

This course builds upon a student’s introductory career management skills particularly in the areas of communication, professionalism, and information seeking. Students actively explore their career interests by completing self-assessments, conducting an information interview, and actively using Career Center and library resources to acquire information related to their major or interest areas.

SBS 220 Business Writing (3) – Conducted in English

The world is constantly changing and businesses as well as individual employees must adapt. In order to effectively leverage future communication technologies and media, you must be a critical reader and have strong foundational writing and editing skills. In this course, current business news will be read for its content and to understand the interplay of language and purpose. You will learn to write effectively for business by focusing on your audience, purpose, tone, and the design of various business documents and by revising and refining your writing. Prerequisites: ENT 101 & WRI 102.

COMMUNICATIONS & JOURNALISM

CJN 103 Presentation Skills (4) – Conducted in English

This course introduces students to the concepts and contexts of communication. The class explores the research, the discipline and the areas of communication.

CJN 277 Public Relations (4) – Conducted in English

This course introduces students to how public relations functions in corporations, governments, and other institutions. The course covers the recent history, latest trends and growing role of public relations in the U.S., Europe, and Spain. Students analyze case studies and real examples to understand the effects of public relations on the community.

CREATIVITY & INNOVATION

CI 141 Science = Creativity (3) – Conducted in English

This course is focusing on the creative process by introducing students to creative practice as a disciplined approach to problem solving and innovation requiring research, persistence and grit. Students will be encouraged to synthesize existing ideas, images, concepts, and skill sets in original ways, embrace ambiguity and support divergent thinking and risk taking.

ECONOMICS

EC 102 Principles of Economics Macroeconomics (4) – Conducted in English

This course covers the following topics: an introduction to the theory of income determination, national income analysis and international trade; the role of labor and capital in aggregate economic activity; problems of unemployment and inflation; functioning and impact of the monetary system; monetary and fiscal policies for economic stabilization; international transactions and their influence on the domestic economy; and U.S. balance of trade deficits and exchange rate fluctuations.

EC 445 Economics of the European Union (4) – Conducted in English

This course introduces students to the politics and development of European integration, the main theories behind the process of integration, the institutional structure of the European Union and the specific economic and political areas of inter-state cooperation.

ESL, ENGLISH LANGUAGE & LITERATURE

ENG 218 American Literature Il (4) – Conducted in English

Study of major American writing and thought from the Puritan age to the present. Regularly assigned essays on reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct, and persuasive writing.

GOVERNMENT

GVT 110 Introduction to American Democracy (4) – Conducted in English

This course provides an introduction to the American political system and constitutional framework. The class will focus on the interplay of various institutions (the Presidency, Congress and the Judiciary) in creating public policies. Contemporary public issues will be discussed, as will the role of political theory in shaping American democracy. Attention will be given to the role of the news media, public opinion, political ideology, political parties and interest groups in the American system.

GVT 115 Evolution of the Global System (4) – Conducted in English

This course provides government students with an account of the development of major world civilizations since the end of the Napoleonic wars up until the present with an emphasis on the development of international relations.

GVT 367 Politics of Spain (4) – Conducted in English

This course is designed to provide students with a basic grounding in political institutions and processes in contemporary Spain. Political developments are presented in their socioeconomic context, with special emphasis on the Spanish transition from a dictatorship to a democracy. Attention is also given to the issue of Basque and Catalán nationalism.

HISTORY

HST 149 Empires and Globalization in World History (4) – Conducted in English

This course provides a survey of the most transcendental developments in World History, focusing on events or themes that have been moved by global forces, or that have had great impact on the collective history of mankind. Emphasis is given to the birth and maturity of the world’s great empires and civilizations and the relationships between empire-building, the interaction between the world’s diverse peoples and societies and the early manifestations of the process of globalization, from the Dawn of Civilization to the Late Middle Ages.

HST 248 Peaceful Coexistence: Muslims, Christians, and Jews in Medieval Iberia (4) – Conducted in English

This course provides a historical survey (711-1492) of Muslim and Christian occupied territories on the Iberian Peninsula (modern-day Spain and Portugal), focusing on principal events and broad trends. Special emphasis will be placed on tolerance as manifested in the toleration of religious minorities, cultural and scientific interaction, translation and peaceful coexistence (convivencia); and on intolerance as manifested through warfare (jihad, crusade), frontier mentality, massacres, forced conversions, the setting up of the Inquisition and the final expulsion of the Jews in 1492 and of the descendants of the converted Muslims or moriscos in 1609 and 1814.

HST 357 History of Spain I (4) – Conducted in English

This course examines and explores the political, economic and social history of Spain from antiquity to 1700. Topics include: Spain before the Roman Conquest; Roman Spain; from slave society to feudal society; the Islamic state and the Christian Reconquest; the formation of the national state; the Spanish Empire and the Golden Age; the Hapsburg state; Spain and the Counter-reformation; the Hapsburg decline; and the crisis of 1700.

HUMANITIES

ARH 101 Art History  I (4) – Conducted in English

This course consists of an introduction to the history of Spanish art and is centered chronologically on art movements in general, but emphasis is given to establishing the differences between Spanish art and its European counterpart. The idea of the three cultures that constituted Medieval Spain is an important and determinant factor in order to explain the eclecticism and uniqueness of Spanish art. There is an additional fee for the cultural visits as part of this course. Contact the API office for details.

MATHEMATICS

MATH 128 Math for the Modern World (4) – Conducted in English

From the ISBN on a book, to buying a car, from the size of small chips in a cell phone, to the size of the national debt, or just reading a graph in the daily newspaper, mathematics plays an important and vital role in countless areas of life–your future career and courses included. Mathematics is both an art and a tool created by humans. The common bond is a way of thinking and a way of reasoning to describe and solve problems of many types. This course uses the context of modern real life problems to introduce math needed for literacy and problem solving in contemporary life and work. It uses a minimal amount of algebra and focuses on math models, concepts and basic math manipulations. It encourages students to move from anxiety about math, to using formulas well, to thinking critically in the math context and use math to solve problems and pose new problems. Topics include scientific notation, basic financial math, linear, exponential and polynomial models and an introduction to probability.

MATH 130 Finite Math (4) – Conducted in English

Topics include: linear equations, graphing, linear programming, sets, Venn diagrams, counting and combinatorics, probability theory, conditional probability, Bayes theorem. Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra, MATH 104, or MATH 108.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 119 Ethics (4) – Conducted in English

This course provides a systematic introduction to the major thinkers and their positions on the main issues of ethics, i.e., What is morality? What are moral values? How do moral judgments differ from other types of statements? Are there objective, universal, absolute moral standards? If so, what are they, and what is their basis?

PHIL 113 Critical Thinking and Argumentation (4) – Conducted in English

This course provides an introduction to non-formal methods of analyzing and formulating arguments, including treatment of such concepts/topics as: the nature of argument, induction, deduction, validity, soundness, aspects of language which tend to interfere with logical thought, definition, role of emotion, types of disagreement, and fallacies. The course also emphasizes the practical application of sound reasoning in both evaluating arguments and making arguments of one’s own about matters of issues facing society.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYCH 114 General Psychology (4) – Conducted in English

This course surveys the concepts and representative findings in the major sub-fields of psychology: history and systems; physiology; perception; thinking; emotion; learning; motivation; development; personality; psychopathology; psychotherapy; and social behavior. Required for psychology majors.

SCIENCE

BIO 104/L104 Environmental Biology with Lab (4) – Conducted in English

This course provides an introduction to basic ecological issues in which concepts including ecosystem ecology, behavioral ecology, community ecology and population ecology serve as a basis for the understanding of life support systems. Major ecosystems of the world are also studied with the aid of audiovisual sessions that visually help enhance the diverse characteristics of each system including a final overall view of the main environmental aspects of Spain. Field trips to the Guadarrama Mountain Range, the National Educational Environmental Center, the Royal Botanical Garden of Madrid, along with the study of microorganisms in the laboratory and ecological aspects of ecological succession surrounding the Royal Palace and the city’s river, reinforce in situ the main aspects studied in the classroom.

CHEM 111/L111 General Chemistry I with Lab (4) – Conducted in English

In this course the fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Topics include: introductions to atomic structure; periodic table; nature of chemical bonds; stoichiometry; gas laws; solutions; acid-base systems; chemical equilibria; thermodynamics; electrochemistry; kinetics; and chemistry of selected elements.

SCI 112/L112 Astronomy II with Lab (4) – Conducted in English

Topics include: astronomy of the Cosmos; Sun, stars, interstellar materials, galaxies, pulsars, quasars, black holes; nature of time relativity cosmology. For non-science majors. There is an additional fee for the lab portion of this course, which takes place at an observatory in the Canary Islands. Contact the API office for details.

SCI 181 Science & Life in the 21st Century (4) – Conducted in English

This is a four credit, non-lab, science course that examines the central scientific problems confronting the 21st century. The course studies particular topics and teaches the necessary science around these topics to provide a good understanding of the issues. The topics currently are: Energy, Science and Economic Decisions, Sustainability of Life on Earth, Health and Science.

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 113 Introduction to Sociology (4) – Conducted in English

This course provides an introduction to the sociological understanding of human interaction, group process and social structures. Students are introduced to basic concepts, theories and methods of sociological investigation.

SOC 228 Cultural Diversity And Human Need (4) – Conducted in English

This course enables students to examine, as well as develop an awareness and appreciation of, diversity within today’s society. Providing an overview of the major racial, ethnic and cultural groups in the U.S., the focus is on the ways in which cultural awareness enhances professional relationships and improves the operation of human services systems.

SPANISH

SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish I (4) – Conducted in Spanish

Students in this course practice their oral and written language skills. Class activities are organized around cultural themes that reflect the diversity of the Hispanic world.

SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish II (4) – Conducted in Spanish

Students in this course practice their oral and written language skills. Class activities are organized around cultural themes that reflect the diversity of the Hispanic world.

SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I (4) – Conducted in Spanish

This course provides a systematic review of Spanish grammar and studies of Spanish through texts of cultural interest. Students develop written and oral skills through compositions and audio-visual materials.

SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II (4) – Conducted in Spanish

This course provides a systematic review of Spanish grammar and studies of Spanish through texts of cultural interest. Students develop written and oral skills through compositions and audio-visual materials.

SPAN 210 Spanish in the Workplace/Internship (4) – Conducted in Spanish

Course description currently unavailable.

SPAN 290 Advanced Conversation and Composition (4) – Conducted in Spanish

This course aims to build vocabulary, normalize pronunciation, review Spanish syntax, and provide extensive writing practice and development of conversational skills through group discussions on subjects of interest to students enrolled.

SPAN 299 Spanish Translation Workshop (4) – Conducted in Spanish

This course provides an introduction to some of the basic techniques applied in translating the written word. Examples are drawn from literature, the mass media and professional sources. Prerequisites: SPAN250, SPAN 290, or consent of instructor.

SPAN 340 Hispanic Culture Today (4) – Conducted in Spanish

This is an introductory-level study of key issues in Hispanic culture today through the study of different cultural manifestations, mostly literature but also film, music, and TV. The purpose of the course is to introduce the students to major themes in recent Hispanic society and culture and to develop the necessary skills to read and analyze literary texts and other cultural forms. Topics to be discussed include dictatorship and democracy, women and representation, political and domestic violence, national identity, immigration, and mass culture. The selected materials include texts by authors like Manuel Rivas, Mario Vargas Llosa, Carlos Fuentes, Cristina Peri Rossi, Rosa Montero, Carlos Monsivis, Roberto Bolao and others.

SPAN 350 Spanish Cultural Studies (4) – Conducted in English

This is an interdisciplinary course, focusing on fundamentally important themes in the development of Spanish culture. This course includes field trips, lectures, and visits to the theater and cinema. Conducted in Spanish.

SPAN 360 Madrid: A Cosmopolitan City (4) – Conducted in Spanish

This course is designed to provide students with a basic knowledge of the city of Madrid in terms of its historical, cultural, and social development. Contemporary aspects of the city such as its rise to prominence amongst the capitals of Europe and the phenomenon of recent immigration patterns are also discussed. Specific grammar points are reviewed as needed. There is an additional fee for the cultural visits as part of this course. Contact the API office for details. Prerequisite: SPAN 201.

SPAN 417 Changes In Social Values In Spain 1975-2005 (4) – Conducted in Spanish

In 1975, after Franco’s death, Spain underwent one of the most interesting processes of social change in Western Europe: the Transition from dictatorship to democracy. The political changes established in the Constitution of 1978 marked a new era of freedom and social reform which triggered an accelerated process of cultural change. Youth culture (sex, drugs and rock & roll), the feminist movement, nationalistic demands, and later the incorporation into the European Union deeply transformed Spanish social values and thus its cultural manifestations. This course studies this process from an interdisciplinary perspective based mostly on the analysis of literary works, film, visual arts and music besides relevant theoretical articles by major Spanish and international intellectuals.