Excursions | API Study Abroad
Excursions

Highlights

  • Ranked #1 in U.K. for welcoming international students, campus environment; #2 in U.K. for sports facilities; top 10 in U.K. for extra-curricular activities/societies; 15 in U.K. for library
  • Ranked #1 in Scotland, top 5 in U.K. for Criminology – Guardian University Rankings
  • Ranked #1 in Scotland, top 10 in U.K. for Media/Film Studies, Social Policy – Guardian University Rankings
  • Ranked #1 in Scotland, top 15 in U.K. for Education – Guardian University Rankings
  • Ranked #2 in Scotland, top 15 in U.K. for Sociology
  • Ranked 1st in Scotland and 8th in U.K. in The Times Higher Education “100 under 50” table, which ranks the world’s best 100 universities under 50 years old
  • Scotland’s “university of sporting excellence”

Requirements

  • Minimum 3.0 G.P.A.
  • Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Completed API Application
  • University contact information form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • One official transcript
  • Copy of passport
  • Entry requirements: valid passport with supporting documents

 

Dates & Fees

ACADEMIC YEAR 2017-2018
Sep 8, 2017 - May 12, 2018
$28,800
SPRING SEMESTER 2018
Jan 12, 2018 - May 12, 2018
$14,800
FALL SEMESTER 2018
Sep 7, 2018 - Dec 15, 2018
$14,800
FALL SEMESTER 2017-2018
Sep 8, 2017 - Dec 16, 2017
$14,800
ACADEMIC YEAR 2018-2019
Sep 7, 2018 - May 11, 2019
$28,800
SPRING SEMESTER 2019
Jan 11, 2019 - May 11, 2019
$14,800

Deadlines

ACADEMIC YEAR 2017-2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Mar 15, 2017
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Apr 15, 2017
SPRING SEMESTER 2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Oct 1, 2017
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Oct 15, 2017
FALL SEMESTER 2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Mar 15, 2018
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Apr 15, 2018
FALL SEMESTER 2017-2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Mar 15, 2017
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Apr 15, 2017
ACADEMIC YEAR 2018-2019
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Mar 15, 2018
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Apr 15, 2018
SPRING SEMESTER 2019
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Oct 1, 2018
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Oct 15, 2018

Excursions

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of their host city, country, and surrounding region. The following is a listing of all excursions for API Stirling programs. All excursions are subject to change.

Spring

EDINBURGH

Edinburgh, nicknamed ‘Auld Reekie’ for its lack of plumbing in the 19 th century, is Scotland’s capital city. The city sits around the Royal Mile, an ancient cobble street with the famous Edinburgh Castle sitting at the top of the street and the Palace of Holyrood House – the Queen’s official residence in Scotland – at the bottom. Nearby is Holyrood Park and Arthur’s Seat, an extinct volcanic which you can climb for stunning panoramas of the city. Edinburgh is home to fine cuisine, culture (boasting seven annual festivals) and stunning architecture. Its Old and New Towns were listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites. And on top of all that, the city is the birthplace of Harry Potter – you can even visit the café where J.K. Rowling created the famous boy wizard!

ISLE OF SKYE AND LOCH NESS

Steeped in history and legend, the Highlands of Scotland are one of the last pristine regions of Europe. This is a land of high mountains, breathtaking islands, spectacular glens and deep, mysterious lochs. There is nature and wildlife to enjoy, imposing castles to explore and tales of folklore, heroes and legends to savor. You will find beautiful sites such as Glencoe with its Three Sisters, a trio of iconic stunning mountains. Also there is Glenfinnan, home to the Glenfinnan Viaduct – most famous for its appearance in Harry Potter as the bridge that the Hogwarts Express crosses. And of course, last but not least, Loch Ness – home to the Loch Ness monster. People have claimed to have spotted the infamous monster for hundreds of years but you can make up your own mind!

Sitting off Scotland’s west coast is the Isle of Skye. With a fairtyle-like atmosphere, the imposing Cuilins (pronounced koo-lin) dominate the southern end of the island with the Fairy Pools, which are said to give eternal beauty to whoever bathes in them, sitting at their foot. The Fairy Glen is like many of Scotland’s great geographical features in miniature and is said to be the entrance to the ancient fairy kingdom. There are small fishing towns and stunning geographical features and formations to discover on this island. We challenge you to not be amazed!

LOCH LOMOND AND THE TROSSACHS NATIONAL PARK

Loch Lomond is the largest freshwater lake in the UK and Scotland’s second most famous loch after Loch Ness. You may be familiar with the loch from the song “Loch Lomond”. The loch certainly lives up to the description it is given in the song – that is as having “bonnie, bonnie banks” (bonnie is a Scottish word for pretty!). At the south end the landscape surrounding the loch is fairly flat but as it reaches the north banks the landscape becomes more mountainous and imposing, meeting with Scotland’s Highlands. There are various viewing points and charming little villages surrounding the loch. Part of the West Highland Way, a 96 mile walk undertaken by many visitors to Scotland, which goes from just outside Glasgow up to Fort William runs by the banks of the river.

SAINT ANDREWS

Saint Andrews is a stunning medieval city and home to the oldest university in Scotland where Prince William and Kate Middleton studied and met. It is also of course the home of golf. There are several golf courses in the town including the world famous Old Course and the town also has its own Golf Museum – great for those of us maybe not keen to play but who want to find out more about this famous sport! On top of all this is a stunning medieval cathedral and a beautiful ruined castle, which both played an important part in the reformation here in Scotland, surrounded by beautiful blue flag beaches!

Fall

EDINBURGH

Edinburgh, nicknamed ‘Auld Reekie’ for its lack of plumbing in the 19 th century, is Scotland’s capital city. The city sits around the Royal Mile, an ancient cobble street with the famous Edinburgh Castle sitting at the top of the street and the Palace of Holyrood House – the Queen’s official residence in Scotland – at the bottom. Nearby is Holyrood Park and Arthur’s Seat, an extinct volcanic which you can climb for stunning panoramas of the city. Edinburgh is home to fine cuisine, culture (boasting seven annual festivals) and stunning architecture. Its Old and New Towns were listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites. And on top of all that, the city is the birthplace of Harry Potter – you can even visit the café where J.K. Rowling created the famous boy wizard!

GLASGOW

Glasgow is the largest city in Scotland and is home to an outstanding variety of museums, galleries and performance venues. Once the 2nd city of the British Empire and a major centre of trade with the USA, Glasgow now wears its Victorian splendour with pride. Everything from impressionistic paintings to medieval armour is on display at Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum. Other attractions are the Gallery of Modern Art, the social history museum Peoples Palace, Glasgow Cathedral and Necropolis, the bustling Merchant City and the Provands Lordship.

HADRIAN’S WALL AND THE BORDERS

Having conquered most of what is modern day England, the Romans decided that the Scots were simply too ferocious to do battle with. They retreated south and built the infamous Hadrian’s Wall – which runs  close to the modern day England-Scotland border. Nowadays sections of the wall still remain intact, as do the ruins of many of the forts the Romans built along the wall’s length to defend themselves. An amazing opportunity to step back in time and imagine life in Roman Britain!

Students will also have a chance to explore the Scottish Borders, a region covering about eighteen hundred square miles. Rolling hills and moorland and lush agricultural plains characterize this sedate and peaceful part of the country. It is home to several beautiful ruined abbeys and imposing stately homes.

OBAN AND ISLES OF MULL AND IONA

Although perhaps not as famous as some of Scotland’s Inner Hebrides which include Mull & Iona are not to be missed. Mull is the largest of these islands and features a variety of landscapes including the rolling hills of Glen More and stunning bays visible from the arrival on ferry. And of course what would a Scottish island be without a few castles thrown in for good measure as well?

Iona lies to the southwest of Mull. With a population not even hitting triple figures it might but seem like much but the island is of great importance to the history of Christianity and is thought to be the birthplace of the religion on the British mainland. The island is surrounded by crystal blue water and covered in lush green grass. It is an ideal peaceful and tranquil getaway from the hustle and bustle of Scotland’s mainland.

All this is accessible from the idyllic coastal town of Oban – a seafood lovers paradise and home to unique local wildlife. Students are bound to fall in love with this part of Scotland!