Course Offerings | API Study Abroad
Course Offerings

Highlights

  • Classes in English with Icelandic students
  • STEM and business courses

Requirements

  • Minimum 2.5G.P.A.
  • Open to juniors and seniors
  • Completed API application
  • University contact information form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • CV/Résumé
  • Official transcript
  • Entry requirement: valid passport with supporting documents (more information provided post-acceptance)

Dates & Fees

FALL 2017-2018
Aug 12, 2017 - Dec 20, 2017
$11,600
ACADEMIC YEAR 2017-2018
Aug 12, 2017 - May 16, 2018
$22,500
SPRING 2018
Jan 3, 2018 - May 16, 2018
$12,880
FALL 2018
Mid-Aug, 2018 - Late Dec, 2018
$12,880
ACADEMIC YEAR 2018-2019
Mid-Aug, 2018 - Mid-May, 2019
$24,780

Deadlines

FALL 2017-2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Apr 15, 2017
PAYMENT DEADLINE
May 1, 2017
ACADEMIC YEAR 2017-2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Apr 15, 2017
PAYMENT DEADLINE
May 1, 2017
SPRING 2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Oct 1, 2017
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Oct 15, 2017
FALL 2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Apr 15, 2018
PAYMENT DEADLINE
May 1, 2018
ACADEMIC YEAR 2018-2019
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Apr 15, 2018
PAYMENT DEADLINE
May 1, 2018

Course Offerings

If you require syllabi, please contact your API Program Manager.

Reykjavik University offers courses in the following subjects in English:

  • Business (Branding, Finance, Human Resource Management, Marketing, Statistics, and more)
  • Computer Science (App Development, Cryptography, Game Design, Web Development, and more)
  • Engineering

Courses at Reykjavik University are generally worth 6 ECTS (or 3 U.S. credits). Students will take 4 courses over a 12-week period, followed by a 2-week exam period, ending with a 3-week, 3-credit intensive project-based course. Courses are geared toward upperclassmen, so students are recommended to have a background in the subjects they plan on studying.

Students are encouraged to take the majority of their courses from one academic department to better ensure course and schedule compatibility.

Please pay attention to the term a particular course is offered, along with that course’s prerequisites. Not all courses are offered every session. The course selection may vary and no course is guaranteed. Some courses may require additional fees for labs, equipment, etc. These fees are not included in the program cost. Contact your Program Manager if you have any questions about the course selection process.

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS – FALL

V-406-TOL2 Applied Statistics II (3)

Theoretical and applied econometrics will be covered. Emphasis will be stressed on various ways to evaluate coefficients of the linear model. Problems that arise during such evaluation will be covered and methods which respond to such problems. These methods will also be covered in grounds of application. Statistical modeling and decision making is one of the basics of this course. Time series analysis and application of prediction models will be introduced. Emphasis on the practical use of the projects.

Prerequisites: Applied Statistics I or equivalent.

V-644-BRAN Branding (3)

This course explores the ideology of strategic brand management where the main emphasis is on fundamental definitions, different methods of measuring customer-based brand equity and how to design and implement an effective and successful branding strategy and maximize customer-based brand equity.

Prerequisites: Marketing Management, Consumer Behavior, Marketing Communication, or equivalents.

V-107-FJAR Corporate Finance (3)

This course covers the fundamental concepts of corporate finance. Based on the time value of money the course discusses key instruments in equity and debt financing and their valuation. This includes a discussion of the relationship between risk and return and key theories in that respect. The course also focuses on capital budgeting and its practical application. The capital structure choice is discussed in both perfect and imperfect market settings. This includes the impact of, e.g., taxes and financial distress as well as a discussion of ways to influence the capital structure including the issuance of securities and pay-out policies.

Prerequisites: Applied Mathematics I, Applied Statistics I, or equivalents.

V-504-AFLE Derivative (3)

The course objective is to extend the students understanding of financial derivatives and how they are applied. After the course, students should be able to price most types of financial derivatives and have an understanding of when and how they are used. The topics covered in the course are Arbitrage and risk-free pricing; pricing and use of forward contracts, swaps and options; hedging; Introduction to interest rate options; use of derivatives in risk management and for investing purposes.

Prerequisites: Applied Mathematics, Corporate Finance, or equivalents.

V-552-STAF Digital Marketing (3)

This course on Digital Marketing builds both an academic and practical understanding of professional practice in the field. The teaching emphasis such things as well defined objectives, key performance indicators, business models in digital media, metrics, and measurements, as well as integrated marketing communications. We will go through each and every media, its strengths and weaknesses. This includes search engine marketing (both organic and paid searches), web pages, social media, mobile, and affiliate marketing.

Prerequisites: Marketing Management or equivalent.

V-524 Leadership (3)

Leadership is an important topic for many reasons and we will explore many of those reasons as well as study the key concepts of leadership. This course offers a special focus on ethical leadership, servant leadership, and team leadership. Through readings, work sessions, case studies, assignment projects etc. students will explore and develop their knowledge and understanding of effective leadership. In addition, the course will emphasize how effective leadership is achieved and how one can analyze and assess effective leadership.

Prerequisite: Management, or equivalent.

V-528-MAVI Marketing and Business Research Methods (3)

This course will cover the role and importance of business research methods as well as the main steps in the research process, also cover the structure of each research method with a special emphasis on surveys. The structure of each method will be explored, its traditions and the way it is conducted. Emphasis is put on measurements, data collection, data analysis, and presentation. SPSS is taught in the course. The SPSS software is commonly used in business and marketing research. Practical assignments are emphasized.

Prerequisites: Applied Statistics, Methodology, or equivalents.

V-522-SERV Service Management(3)

This course is an introduction course in Service Management and will present the main concepts and practical skills necessary to know and use for building good performance in the management of service companies.

V-516-VERD Valuation (3)

This course will examine all the major equity valuation methods. A consideration will be given to valuation under different situations and different types of companies, and how to evaluate the valuation criteria. The interpretation of the valuation and its reasoning will be discussed, taking into account the different results of various methods. There will be an examination of various research reports and real-life business cases. Valuation in M&A and financial restructuring situations will be examined. Value management and value enhancing methods will be addressed. The students are expected to complete one comprehensive valuation project culminating in a research report, which will be handed in in 3 modules. There may be a guest lecture(s) during the course.

Prerequisites: Financial Accounting, Corporate Finance, Design and Analysis of Analysis of Financial Statements, or equivalents.

3-WEEK END-OF-SEMESTER COURSES – CHOOSE 1

These intensive, hands-on project-based courses are offered after the exam period and are worth 3 credits. Students will choose and register for this course on-site. These course options may change between the application period and arrival on-site.

V-511-STST Human Resource Management (3)

This course covers the employment process from recruitment to termination, including staffing, training and development, performance management, compensation, employee relations and legal issues. Emphasis on the strategic role of HRM, the roles of line managers vs. HR managers and measurement of results. Practical exercises and analysis of cases are used in class.

Prerequisite: Management or equivalent.

V-208-ALVI International Business (3)

This course focuses on one hand on the international environment: The global system of trade, international trade theory, political economy of trade, barriers to international trade, regional trading arrangements, EU and NAFTA, the impact of culture on international business, foreign investment, location of production, GATT, WTO, the international monetary system and IMF. On the other hand, it deals with the international interests of individual companies. This includes, e.g., gain and risk of foreign operations, analysis of different ways to internationalization; Icelandic companies: history and insights gained from foreign activity, organization of international business; foreign marketing and development, alliances, im/exporting, management, financial control, and accounting.

Prerequisites: Macroeconomics, Marketing Management, or equivalents.

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS – SPRING

V-512-ATFE Behavioral Economics (3)

This course describes how individuals and firms make financial decisions, and how those decisions might deviate from those predicted by traditional financial or economic theory. Using theories of human behavior from the fields of psychology, sociology and other fields of sciences related to decision-making, common features of irrational behavior in the financial markets will be described and analyzed.
Prerequisites: V-107-FJAR, Corporate Finance

V-304-FMAR Financial Markets (3)

Financial markets are important pillars of every civilized society. They facilitate economic activities and provide services and products to manage risks. It is important to understand the function of financial institutions in order to be able to predict their reactions towards different economic events and how they will evolve over time. This course is set to support students in their learning of different theories of finance and how those theories are linked with financial history, the strengths and weaknesses of financial institutions, such as banks, insurance companies, stock and derivatives markets, and what the future holds for those institutions.
Prerequisites: V-103-THAG, Macroeconomics; V-107-FJAR, Corporate Finance

V-202-REGR Managerial Accounting (3)

The course covers main processes and philosophy of sales and sales management. How sales management can help in creating customer value. The course teaches how to develop, manage and motivate your sales force. Explores key issues and recent trends, such as team development, diversity in the workforce, sales force automation, CRM, inside sell and global selling. Basic negations skills are also a part of the course.

Prerequisites: Financial Accounting

V-644-IEND Introduction to Accounting (3)

During the course, students will be introduced to the basic factors in auditing of financial statements. Students will be introduced to the International Standards on Auditing (ISA´s) by reading a textbook. Students will go through the whole audit process, all from planning the audit to the procedures performed at the end of the audit. Also, students will be introduced to the basic factors in entities effective internal control. In the end of the course, students should be able to understand the purpose and theories of auditing and distinguish between different audit opinions. The course material will be the textbook Auditing and Assurance services by Aasmund Eilifsen, William F. Messier, Steven M. Glover og Douglas Pravitt as well as articles and other material that will be introduced during the course.
Prerequisites: V-108-REHA, Financial Accounting, V-307-GARS, Design and Analysis of Ann. Fin. Statem.

V-311-OPMA Operations Management (3)

Topics covered include:

  • The activities of operations management and the role of the operations function in achieving strategic success.
  • The development of operations management and process management.
  • The volume – variety effect on process design, layout, process technology, and job design.
  • Configuring the supply network.
  • The activities of supply chain management.
  • Types of relationships in supply chains.
  • Supply chain behavior.
  • The location of capacity.
  • Forecasting demand.
  • Planning and control activities.
  • Measuring demand and capacity.
  • The alternative capacity plans.
  • The use of OEE in capacity calculations.
  • Inventory management.
  • The volume decision – how much to order.
  • The timing decision – when to place an order.
  • JIT planning and control.
  • The maser production schedule and MRP.
  • Enterprise resource planning (ERP).
  • Project management.
  • Performance measurements, benchmarking and the balanced scorecard.
  • Quality control and how quality problems can be diagnosed.
  • Business improvement and improvement methods.
  • Improvement priorities.
  • Breakthrough vs. continuous improvement.
  • Business process reengineering (BPR).
  • Strategy and operations strategy.
  • Organizations and the importance of an end-to-end process focus when it comes to strategic planning and organizational design.
  • The process concept and the process focused organization.
  • Management systems: The Lean management system.
  • TQM and Six Sigma.
V-601-EIGN Portfolio Management (3)

The course objective is twofold. The main emphasis is on introducing students to investor methodology in the securities market when forming portfolios. Students are especially expected to gain an overview of what is available in the domestic and international financial markets. Students will be introduced to main theories and approaches of capital asset allocation. The major pricing models are also covered along with individual theories on the pricing of stocks. There is great emphasis on students being able to apply the technical part of the study, i.e. able to present the problems they are dealing with in an organized manner, using the necessary formulas.
Prerequisites: V-107-FJAR, Corporate Finance, V-303-TOL1, Applied Statistics I, V-304-FMAR, Financial Markets

V-627-VERK Project Management (3)

At the end of this course the student should expect the following outcomes:

  • Knowledge regarding traditional project management methods and it’s position in the world of management concepts and theories.
  • Knowledge concerning planning techniques of project ea project objectives, scoping, scheduling and cost planning with CPM, PERT and Gantt charts, use of learning curves and NPV calculations to estimate project profitability etc. Also to establish project control system based on Earned Value accounting methods.
  • To be familiar with the PRINCE2 project management environment.
  • Knowledge of project team building and the use of analysis ea decision trees, Ishikawa analysis, Pareto analysis, risk assessment etc to be able to focus on the main topics and tasks of the project.
V-633-SOST Sales Management (3)

This course covers the main processes and philosophy of sales and sales management, as well as how sales management can help in creating customer value. The course teaches students how to develop, manage and motivate a sales force. The course explores key issues and recent trends, such as team development, diversity in workforce, sales force automation, CRM, inside sell and global selling. Basic negations skills are also a part of the course.

V-649-STMP Strategic Marketing Planning (3)

The aim of the course is to introduce the marketing planning process. Students will conduct their own marketing plan built on current marketing practices. Key concepts and methodologies include marketing objectives and metrics, marketing planning, segmentation, consumer research and customer analytics, and marketing models. Strategic marketing planning takes students step-by-step through the process of developing a creative, effective marketing plan for a brand that they choose. Packed with real-life examples, up-to-date marketing ideas and detailed sample plans, the course offers practical guidance on how to research, prepare and present a valuable marketing plan. Emphasis is on student participation in class, discussions, analysis, presentations and case studies.
Prerequisites: V-105-MAR1, Marketing Management I, V-523-MACO, Consumer Behavior and Marketing Communication

SCHOOL OF COMPUTER SCIENCE – FALL

T-409-TSAM Computer Networks (3)

This course begins with a short overview of network systems and services. Afte an introduction, the focus will be on the layers of the OSI and IETF models. The following network layers will be studied in the details: application layer (WWW, HTTP, DNS, SMTP, FTP etc), transport layer (UDP and TCP), network layer (link state routing and distance vector routing, IP, IP-addresses, link layer (MAC, Ethernet, Hubs and switches). Finally an introduction to some more specific topics such as mobile networks, multimedia networking, and network security will be given. Students will also work on the topics through programming assignments and homework.

Prerequisites: Data Structure, Computer Architecture, or equivalents.

T-504-ITML Introduction to Machine Learning (3)

This course presents an overview of the field of machine learning, which deals with finding patterns and rules in large datasets. Such rules can then be used to predict outcomes of future events, for example with the aim of improving decision-making in a wide range of business and manufacturing disciplines. In this course we will study machine learning techniques for classification and clustering as well as other selected techniques. In addition to introducing the underlying theory the the methods will be used to solve practical problems

Prerequisites: Algorithms, Calculus and Statistics, Discrete Math, or equivalents.

T-511-TGRA Computer Graphics (3)

Computer graphics is an increasing part of today’s programmer projects. The first part of this course covers the use of the OpenGL library, vector tools for graphics, transformations of objects and polygonal meshes.The second part deals in more detail with three-dimensional drawing with emphasis on perspective, depth, light and color. In the end, several issues regarding the implementation of a renderer are presented, in addition to curve and surface design. During the course, students build several programs related to the course material.

Prerequisites: Algorithms, or equivalent.

T-519-STOR Theory of Computation (3)

The main topic of this course is the theoretical basis of computer science. Various types of finite automata are introduced and connected to the formal definition of a programming language. Turing machines are introduced as a theoretical model for computation. Computability is discussed and the classification of solvable and unsolvable problems. Finally there is a discussion of complexity classes and the classification of algorithmically hard and easy problems.

Prerequisites: Discrete Math, Algorithms, or equivalents.

T-513-CRNU Cryptography and Number theory (3)

In this class we treat the basics of cryptography and number theory. We start with some classical ciphers and the the tools from number theory necessary for doing cryptography. We cover symmetric and asymmetric ciphers. Some topics from groups, rings and fields will be introduced and used, especially when we look at elliptic curve cryptography. There will be some programming exercises in addition to standard mathematical homework. You will use the programming language Sage to program with.

Prerequisites: Discrete Math, Calculus and Statistics, Algorithms, or equivalents.

3-WEEK END-OF-SEMESTER COURSES – CHOOSE 1

These intensive, hands-on project-based courses are offered after the exam period, and are worth 3 credits. Students will choose and register for this course on-site. These course options may change between the application period and arrival on-site.

E-402-STFO Mathematical Programming (3)

Mathematics is generally discovered through experiments. Traditional tools for such experiments are pen and paper, and, of course, the mind. A (historically) recent addition to these tools is the computer. We will look at problems from several areas of mathematics and, in particular, how programming can be used as a means to better understand and ultimately solve those problems. This will involve designing and implementing algorithms, experimentation to make conjectures, and deductive/formal mathematics to prove conjectures. For programming we will use python/sage languages.

Pre-requisites: Discrete Mathematics, Calculus and Statistics, Algorithms

SCHOOL OF COMPUTER SCIENCE – SPRING

T-637-GEDE Game Engine Architecture (3)

The course covers the theory and practice of game engine software development, bringing together topics that range from large-scale software architectures and modern game programming paradigms to the design and implementation of subsystems for rendering, resource management, user interfaces, sound, collision, physics and animation. Through practical lab exercises and group projects, the students will get technical hands-on experience in C++ game development, including the use and development of supporting tool pipelines.

Prerequisites: Linear Algebra, Algorithms, Computer Graphics, or equivalents.

T-622-ARTI Artificial Intelligence (3)

Artificial intelligence (AI) is devoted to the computational study of intelligent behavior, including areas such as problem-solving, knowledge representation, reasoning, planning and scheduling, machine learning, perception and communication. This course gives an overview of the aforementioned AI subfields from computer science perspective and introduces fundamental solution techniques for addressing them. As a part of the course, the students study a selected specialized topic in-depth.

Prerequisites: Algorithms, or equivalent.

T-501-FMAL Programming Languages (3)

The evolution of programming languages is an important factor in computer science. The course describes this evolution from the first programming languages to the more recent languages. Different types of programming languages are discussed and their characteristics compared. Programming languages syntax is introduced as well as Backus-Naur Form (BNF). Main characteristics of imperative languages are examined, particularly regarding to scope rules and procedure activations. Focus is on the Smalltalk programming environment while discussing object-oriented languages. The constructs of functional programming languages are examined with emphasis on Lambda calculus and the ML language. Logic programming is introduced and the Prolog language is specifically analyzed. Students are introduced to the design and syntax of the above languages and experiment with several programming projects using some of these languages.

Prerequisites: Data structures, Discrete Mathematics, or equivalents.

T-611-NYTI New Technology (3)

The objective of this course is to look at innovations and technology trends, learn from history, and using theories of innovations to study lessons and try to see patterns so we can evaluate new technology currently emerging and interpret the impact. In the course we look at how to keep up to date on technology trends. In particular we will look at communications, wireless devices, mobile phones and the TV, home appliances, the Internet and other consumer devices. The course will discuss what future trends will emerge, which standards and companies will be successful, and the effects that the technology will have on society. As a term project, students will perform research and write a research paper on technology, the possibilities and effect on society.

3-WEEK END-OF-SEMESTER COURSES – CHOOSE 1

These intensive, hands-on project-based courses are offered after the exam period, and are worth 3 credits. Students will choose and register for this course on-site. These course options may change between the application period and arrival on-site.

T-419-CADP Concurrent and Distributed Programming (3)

Multi-Core machines, networks of interconnected computers and heterogeneous computing environments have become ubiquitious. Writing programs that utilize these computer‘s resources to its fullest involves writing multi-threaded and distributed programs. In this course, participants learn to write such programs in C using the pthreads API and in Erlang. They learn to avoid unintended nondeterministic effects and deadlocks and they learn to structure concurrent and distrbibuted programs. We repeat the basics of threads, processes, semaphores and mutexes. Then, patterns are described to structure common algorithms for concurrent execution and understand the basic architectures (recursive parallelism, iterative parallelism, mesh parallelism, bag of tasks). We consider programming with monitors and with transactional memory. After understanding the problems of shared variable concurrency and its problem, we consider distributed message passing systems. By encapsulating a state and decoupling the control flow with messaging, one can avoid many problems of shared variable programs. Participants learn to structure distriuted applications and understand their architecture. They will also consider coordination methods that describe how the activities of the processes in a distributed system achieve a common goal. Distributed systems will be implemented in Erlang. Erlang is a concurrency oriented, functional programming language for distributed, soft-realtime, and fault-tolerant applications. Erlang is used, e.g. at Facebook and Amazon, for real-time trading applications and online games. At the end, participants are able to demonstrate a concurrent application, understand the way it is constructed and be able to justify the properties of the application. They understand the trade-offs of the language mechanism and know the structural similarities and differences the language mechanism exhibit.

Prerequisites: Operating Systems, Algorithms, or equivalents.

T-219-REMO Real-time Models (3)

Context for the course Computing systems are everywhere in modern society; they are becoming increasingly sophisticated and they control key aspects of our lives. In fact, computation is even more widely present in our world than most people realize! Think, for instance, of embedded computing devices, such as those that control ABS systems in cars, the temperature of our houses or the functioning of mobile phones. This population of ‘effectively invisible’ computers around us is embedded in the fabric of our homes, shops, vehicles, farms and some even in our bodies. They help us command, control, communicate, do business, travel and entertain ourselves, and these ‘invisible’ computers largely outnumber the desktop or laptop computers we see each day. In light of the increasing complexity of such computing devices, and of the fact that they control important, when not altogether safety critical, operations, it is important to adopt high standards of quality in their development and validation. However, when dealing with software controlled devices, we still accept routinely that such systems crash and must be rebooted. In fact, we would be surprised if we did not have to send error reports to software manufacturers! Come to think of it, software-controlled devices are just about the only products we engineer for which we accept this level of brittleness. You do not enter your car each day expecting it to stop and ready to send an error report to the car manufacturer, do you? Do software-controlled systems have to be more unreliable than cars, say? A key scientific challenge in computer science is to design and develop computing systems that do what they were designed to do, and do so reliably. In order to meet the challenge of building dependable systems, computer scientists are increasingly using model-based approaches to their design and validation. This means that, before actually constructing a system, one follows the time-honoured engineering approach of making a model of its design and of subjecting the model to a thorough analysis, whose ultimate aim is to certify that the design embodied by the model meets its intended specification.

The aim of this course is to introduce the basic ideas underlying the model of timed automata, a graphical formalism for the description of real-time computing systems due to Rajeev Alur and David Dill. During the course, you will use the model to describe algorithms, games, scheduling problems and other fun scenarios with relevance to computer science, and to analyze the behavior of the systems you have modeled using the automatic verification tool Uppaal. Uppaal is an integrated tool environment for the description, validation, and verification of real-time systems modeled as networks of communicating timed automata, extended with data types. Summing up, this is a course in which you will be introduced to a little neat theory with real impact on the practice of the development of computing systems in a world that increasingly depends on the quality of software-controlled devices. Can you do without this knowledge?

Prerequisites: Programming, or equivalent.

T-604-HGRE Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3)

Students in this course will study all the major algorithmic strategies, including divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, greedy algorithms, network flow, and randomized algorithms. Think of this as a course on “how to solve it by a computer”. We do so by studying how classical paradigmatic problems are solved, and how to apply the ideas to new problems. We will also link the problem-solving part to programming contest problems. We emphasize reasoning: understanding why something works, and the ability to explain it. Course assignments will primarily focus on written arguments (in LaTeX), in addition to the problem-solving aspect. During recitation classes, students are expected to present their solutions to the class and participate in discussions.

Prerequisites: T-117-STR1, Discrete Mathematics I; T-301-REIR, Algorithms; T-419-STR2, Discrete Mathematics II

T-631-SOE2 Software Engineering II – Testing (3)

Building modern software systems requires not only programming skills but also engineering skills. Software development includes requirement analysis, design, implementation, and testing. Various studies show that over than 50% of efforts and costs of software development are devoted to activities related to testing. This includes test design, execution, and evaluation. This course is an introductory course to software testing in which students will learn quantitative, technical, and practical methods and techniques that software engineers use to test their software along with the software lifecycle. The course is based on the textbook: Introduction to Software Testing, by Paul Ammann and Jeff Offutt. Accordingly, the focus will be on how we can design better tests based on coverage criteria. The course covers topics, such as Graph Coverage, Logic Coverage, Input Space Partitioning and Syntax-Based Testing. In some discussions, we will use other references to get a deeper understanding of the subject.

Prerequisites: T-303-HUGB – Software Engineering.

T-634-AGDD Advanced Game Design & Development (3)

This course expands RU’s prior offerings in game design & development with more advanced topics in game and interaction design. Through lectures, lab exercises, and project work, students will learn and gain experience with a variety of game design topics. Working together in teams, students will design, develop, and critically analyze several smaller games, each focused on applying the concepts that are discussed in class. Each of these exercises will differ in terms of either the team’s composition, the game’s scope, or the constraints that the instructors provide to guide the creation process. Each student will also take on a different development role for each exercise. After the exercises are complete, students will form new teams and apply their new knowledge to a larger development project. Masters students will additionally complete a small research project related to the course topics.

Prerequisites: T-624-CGDD, Computer Game Design & Development

T-505-ROKF Logic in Computer Science (3)

Logic has been called “the calculus of computer science”. The argument is that logic plays a fundamental role in computer science, similar to that played by calculus in the physical sciences and traditional engineering disciplines. Indeed, logic plays an important role in areas of Computer Science as disparate as architecture (logic gates), software engineering (specification and verification), programming languages (semantics, logic programming), databases (relational algebra and SQL), artificial intelligence (automatic theorem proving, multi-agent systems, knowledge and belief), algorithms (complexity and expressiveness), and theory of computation (general notions of computability). See, for instance, the slides available at http://www.ru.is/faculty/luca/SLIDES/logic-and-cs.pdf for more information. This course provides the student with a thorough introduction to computational logic, covering the topics of syntax, semantics, decision procedures and formal systems for various logics that play a crucial role in applications in computer science, namely propositional and first-order logic, and modal and temporal logics. The material is taught from a computer science perspective, with an emphasis on the use of logic as a specification language and general-purpose problem-solving tool in computer science. As part and parcel of the course, we shall introduce various logic-based software tools and the algorithms and data structures underlying them; examples include BDD-based tools, SAT solvers and model checkers. The goal is to prepare the students for using logic as a formal tool in computer science.

Prerequisites: T-117-STR1, Discrete Mathematics I; T-419-STR2, Discrete Mathematics II

T-732-GAPL General Game Playing (3)

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the field of general game playing. The aim of general game playing is to create intelligent autonomous agents that automatically learn how to play many different games at an expert level without any human intervention, given only a description of the game rules. This requires that the agents learn diverse game-playing strategies without any game-specific knowledge being provided by their developers. A successful realization of this task involves the understanding and application of topics from many artificial-intelligence sub-disciplines, such as knowledge representation, agent-based reasoning, heuristic search, and machine learning. This course provided the students with such a background as well as an introduction to different parallel processing paradigms in the context of game-tree search, but parallel processing is fast becoming increasingly more relevant because of the foreseen development of massively multi-core computers.

V-202-REGR Managerial Accounting (3)

The course covers main processes and philosophy of sales and sales management. How sales management can help in creating customer value. The course teaches how to develop, manage and motivate your sales force. Explores key issues and recent trends, such as team development, diversity in work force, sales force automation, CRM, inside sell and global selling. Basic negations skills are also a part of the course.

Prerequisites: Financial Accounting

V-311-OPMA Operations Management (3)

Topics covered include:

  • The activities of operations management and the role of the operations function in achieving strategic success.
  • The development of operations management and process management.
  • The volume – variety effect on process design, layout, process technology, and job design.
  • Configuring the supply network.
  • The activities of supply chain management.
  • Types of relationships in supply chains.
  • Supply chain behavior.
  • The location of capacity.
  • Forecasting demand.
  • Planning and control activities.
  • Measuring demand and capacity.
  • The alternative capacity plans.
  • The use of OEE in capacity calculations.
  • Inventory management.
  • The volume decision – how much to order.
  • The timing decision – when to place an order.
  • JIT planning and control.
  • The maser production schedule and MRP.
  • Enterprise resource planning (ERP).
  • Project management.
  • Performance measurements, benchmarking and the balanced scorecard.
  • Quality control and how quality problems can be diagnosed.
  • Business improvement and improvement methods.
  • Improvement priorities.
  • Breakthrough vs. continuous improvement.
  • Business process reengineering (BPR).
  • Strategy and operations strategy.
  • Organizations and the importance of an end-to-end process focus when it comes to strategic planning and organizational design.
  • The process concept and the process focused organization.
  • Management systems: The Lean management system.
  • TQM and Six Sigma.
V-304-FMAR Financial Markets (3)

Financial markets are important pillars of every civilized society. They facilitate economic activities and provide services and products to manage risks. It is important to understand the function of financial institutions in order to be able to predict their reactions towards different economic events and how they will evolve over time. This course is set to support students in their learning of different theories of finance and how those theories are linked with financial history, the strengths and weaknesses of financial institutions, such as banks, insurance companies, stock and derivatives markets, and what the future holds for those institutions.
Prerequisites: V-103-THAG, Macroeconomics; V-107-FJAR, Corporate Finance

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING – FALL

RECOMMENDED COURSE
T-150-SUST Sustainable Development (3)

This course explores development and its implications by studying the economic history of Iceland, particularly with regard to the part played by renewable energy, commercial fishing, and tourism from the 20th century onwards. Iceland offers an interesting case for study.

Iceland was settled in 9th century, and over the course of a few hundred years of human activity the long term equilibrium of the island was disrupted causing severe environmental degradation. By the turn of the 20th century Iceland was one of the poorest countries in Europe. Over the course of the last hundred years, utilization of Iceland’s considerable resources has allowed a remarkable transformation of the country, which now enjoys a standard of living among the best in the world and is often considered a leader in the sustainable use of natural resources. The relatively small size and simplicity of the Icelandic economy makes it particularly understandable and suitable for analysis. In this course we tie together environmental, technological, economic and political development. The approach is science based and with a quantitative outlook.

Topics covered are: Settlement of Iceland and its environmental impact; brief economic history of Iceland from 900-1900; geoscientific background on development in Iceland; basics of sustainable development: resources, growth and innovation; concepts of energy: force, energy, power, efficiency; forms of energy, transformation of energy, availability, uses for energy; geothermal energy; hydropower; wind power; the Icelandic energy sector as a prototype; future outlook of energy sector; overview of commercial fishing; economic impact; marine ecology; transferrable fishing quota system; tourism and tourism management – framework; harmonizing different aspects of resource utilization.

OPTIONAL COURSES
T-306-RAS1 Analog Circuit Analysis (3)

This course will cover the following topics:

  • Basic concepts of charge, current, power and energy.
  • Circuit elements, including different types of sources.
  • Basic laws, including Ohm’s and Kirchhoff’s laws.
  • Series and parallel connections, and Delta and Wye transformations.
  • Circuit analysis methods; node voltage and mesh current methods.
  • Circuit theorems; superposition, source transformation, Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems and maximum power transfer.
  • Operational amplifiers (Op-Amp) and its basic circuits.
  • Inductors and capacitors and series and parallel combinations.
  • First order RL and RC circuits, and the natural, forced and steady-state responses.
  • Second order series and parallel RLC circuits.
  • Concepts of phasors and impedances for AC sinusoidal analysis
  • Circuits methods and theorems for AC sinusoidal steady-state and AC power analysis

Prerequisites: Calculus I (T-101-STA1), Physics II (T-202-EDL2) or equivalents.

T-561-LIFF Biomechanics (3)

The foundation of biomechanics will be introduced and how movement and muscle forces will affect internal joint forces and stress distribution in various joints within the body. Equilibrium calculations on internal joint moments and joint reaction forces will be introduced as well as muscle fores in statically determinite and indeterminate systems. Motion analysis and how it can be used to capture movement in 3D space. Gait analysis will be discussed and a lab be carried out. Material properties of bone, cartilage, ligaments and tendons will be introduced and stuctural mechanics used to calculate stress in various joints of the body for a given load case. Biomechanical analysis if various joints of the body, such as knee, hip, back, shoulder and wrist will be discussed. Finally, pathomechanics will be introduced and how diseases such as osteoporosis, arthritis and other degenerative diseased will affect the biomechanics and how mechanical stability can be achieved using total joint arthroplasty or other surgical procedures.

Prerequisites: Statics and Mechanics of Materials (T-106-BURD), Physics I (T-102-EDL1), or equivalents.

T-534-AFLF Classical Dynamics (3)

The goal of this course is to enhance the student’s skill in applying Newton laws of motion. Great emphasis will be put on problem-solving. Various forms of Newton ́s laws will be used to solve problems related to complex motion in two and three dimensions.

Prerequisites: Physics I (T-102-EDL1), Calculus II (T-201-STA2), or equivalents.

T-603-AKVA Decision Analysis for Management (3)

The general learning outcome is to be able to use structured methods to increase the quality, risk awareness and
professionalism in decision making when uncertainty is attached to the outcome and best option.

This will be aquired by the following :

  • The use of applied statistics in decision analysis.
  • The major methods and procedures of decision analysis ea SMART, decision trees, Bayes rule, Monte Carlo
    simulation, value of information, utility theory, forecasting, NPV etc.
  • A study on decision fallacies and cognitive biases.
  • A study of basic decision models.
  • The methods of group work, negation skills and authentic leadership.

Prerequisites: Statistics I (or equivalent).

T-503-AFLE Derivatives (3)

This course starts with a brief introduction to derivatives and interest rates. The students will learn to construct
the term structure of interest rates and study the models used to explain its shape. Then, forward contracts on interest
rates and market assets will be introduced. Swap contracts will be discussed with focus on their cash flows and pricing
techniques. Finally, derivative contracts on equity, bonds and interest rates will be discussed in some detail. During the
course various cases will be studied where students can apply the acquired knowledge to practical situations.

Prerequisites: Securities T-303-VERD or equivalent.

RT EXH 1013 Electromagnetic Theory and Semiconductors (3) – MAY BE OFFERED IN ENGLISH OR ICELANDIC

Topics covered in this course include:

  • Electromagnetic theory calls for a good understanding of mathamatics, especially vector analysis. The basics of vector analysis will be reviewed in this course.
  • Applied electromagnetics: Electric and magnetic fields; electro- and magnetostatics; Maxwells equations; induction; transmission lines, Smith chart, matching in high frequency transmission line circuits; electromagnetic waves and their propagation.
  • Semiconductors: fundamentals of semiconductors, pn junction, pn junction operation, current-voltage relationship of the junction, diodes.

Prerequisites: Physics II (T-202-EDL2 or RT EDL2003), or equivalents.

T-536-RENN Fluid Mechanics (3)

This course covers the fundamental concepts in fluid dynamics, properties of fluids, hydrostatics, fundamental laws of fluid dynamics in integral and differential form, Bernoulli’s equation, potential flow, solutions to the Navier-Stokes equation for simple viscous flows, dimensional analysis, pipe flow, boundary layer theory and compressible flows.

Prerequisites: Calculus II (T-201-STA2), Physics II (T-202-EDL2), Thermodynamics (T-507-VARM), or equivalents.

T-411-Mech Mechatronics I (3)

This course provides an introduction to Mechatronics, the technique of interfacing software, electronics, and mechanical components. We will be utilizing the low-cost Arduino microcontroller platform as our method for sensing and control. Students will have pay a fee for their personal lab kit which includes some shared parts for team-based labs.

The course will begin with an introduction to microcontroller programming and software engineering. This includes C++ and Subversion (for collaboration). The course will then shift to electronics design, implementation, and testing. The course will cover both analog and digital electronics with a focus on interfacing to sensors, DC motors, and stepper motors. Students will be designing and building PCB boards using Altium to integrate the electronics being developed.

Students will choose a final mechatronics group project to be presented at the end of the semester. This project should involve manufacturing mechanical elements and interfacing them with the microcontrollers to demonstrate their mastery of the subject.

Prerequisites:  Practical Programming (AT FOR1003) , Statics and Mechanics of Materials (T-106-BURD), Calculus III (T-301-MATH), Electric Circuits (T-509-RAFT), or equivalents.

3-WEEK END-OF-SEMESTER COURSES – CHOOSE 1

These intensive, hands-on project-based courses are offered after the exam period, and are worth 3 credits. Students will choose and register for this course on-site. These course options may change between the application period and arrival on-site.

T-316-RAS2 Analogue Circuit Design (3)

Topics covered in this course include:

Frequency response; transfer function and frequency filters

  • Laplace transform and the inverse Laplace transform; definition and properties.
  • Laplace transform applications in electric circuit analysis.
  • Fourier series; definition and properties.
  • Fourier transform and the inverse Fourier transform, and concept of applying Fourier series to circuit analysis.
  • Two-port networks; the relationship between input and output currents and voltages, network parameters and different combinations of networks connections.

Prerequisites: Analog Circuit Analysis (T-306-RAS1), Mathematics III (T-301-MATH Stærðfræði III), or equivalents.

T-316-STAF Digital Electronics (3)

This course is an introduction to digital electronics with link to Biomedical engineering applications. It covers combinational and sequential logic circuits. Topics include number systems, Boolean algebra, logic families, medium scale integration (MSI) and large scale integration (LSI) circuits, analog to digital (AD) and digital to analog (DA) conversion, and other related topics such as applications in Medical devices.

Prerequisites: Calculus I (T-101-STA1), Physics I (T-102-EDL1), Linear Algebra (T-211-LINA), Analog Circuit Analysis (T-306-RAS1), or equivalents.

T-316-LABB Measurement Systems (3)

This course introduces the essential general characteristics of measuring devices, data acquisition systems, uncertainty analysis, on how to use uncertainty analysis as a tool to design experiments, and sampling and spectral analysis. Planning and executing experiments, and report writing are also covered.

Prerequisites:  Physics I (T-102-EDL1), Statics and mechanics of materials (T-106-BURD), Classical dynamics (T- 534-AFLF), or equivalents.

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING – SPRING

RECOMMENDED COURSE
T-845-ENVI Introduction to Environmental Engineering (4)

The purpose of this course is to get an overview of growing environmental problems and to understand and discuss how sciences and engineering principles can help reduce the anthropogenic impacts on the natural environment. In particular, the importance of preserving clean water, air, and land resources for humans and for the wildlife will be discussed. In particular, the need and potential of clean and renewable energy production and low carbon economy will be discussed. Specific topics include climate change; environmental footprint, airborne pollution; groundwater; ecological disruption; and economic disruption. The course is composed of three parts: i) theoretical lectures about environmental engineering, ii) numerical and research exercises and iii) student project development. Students are expected to develop an environmental engineering project aiming at reducing the ecological footprint and enhancing the UN sustainability goals. MSc students have the option to develop a research plan in collaboration with an international partner institution for a potential MSc thesis.

Prerequisites: Scientific writing and basic research methods; Elementary knowledge of calculus, physics, chemistry and biology, or equivalents.

OPTIONAL COURSES
T-621-CLIN Clinical Engineering (3)

In this course, participation in class is necessary since most of the work will performed in class during the lectures
time. Briefly the course content is the follow: Part-I, CE General

  • Basic of biomedical engineering science and CE discipline.
  • Health technology evaluation, design and control in the hospital, acquisition, maintenance and repair of medical
    devices.
  • Patient safety issue, risk management and electromagnetic interference in the hospital.
  • Medical device regulatory, health care quality, ISO standards.
  • Information system management, telemedicine, communication system (PACS).
  • Clinical engineering practise at Landspitali: medical device park, acquisition and maintenance Part-II, CE E
    lectronic.
  • Electrical safety in clinical enviroments.
  • Leakage currents.
  • Fault conditions.
  • Medical devices utilization and service: intensive care, operating room, anaesthesiology.
  • Engineering the clinical environment: Physical plant, heating, air conditioning, operation room, electrical power.
  • The future of clinical engineering.
  • Pratical Mesurments of leakage current.

Prerequisites: Calculus III (T-301-MATH), Physics II (T-202-EDL2), Analog Circuit Analysis (T-306-RAS1),
Physiology II (T-306-LIFE), Physics III (T-307-HEIL).

VT HUN1003 Design in Mechanical Engineering (3) – MAY BE OFFERED IN ENGLISH OR ICELANDIC

This course will begin with lectures on the basics of design including systematic processes to harness creative thinking. It will cover basics of collaboration software usage. Emphasis and evaluation will be placed equally on effective process, documentation/presentation, and results. The semester’s assignments will consist of a mixture of individual and team assignments.

Prerequisites:  Maching Element Design (VT VHF2013), Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer (VT STV1003), Metals and Manufacturing Processes (VT EFV2003), or equivalents.

T-420-HONX Design X (6)

Students in this course work in groups on a project that is defined each year. The students’ goal is to design, build, test, and refine subsystems enabling the participation of a RU student team in the 2017 Formula Student competition or similar open-ended interdisciplinary projects.

Examples of past projects include:

  • Rocket
  • “Mars” rovers
  • Autonomous submarine
  • Robot for temperature inspection in aluminum smelter
  • Walking robot for Össur
  • Sound probe for recording whale sounds in sea
  • Formula student race car

Prerequisites:  Teacher approval. Admission into the course is limited and efforts are made to ensure that students with various talents and backgrounds are admitted, in order to create an integral group.

T-509-RAFT Electronics (3)

Topics covered in this course include:

  • Review of signal-processing basicsReview of feedback systems. Electronic devices. Large- and small-signal models
  • Review of feedback systemsElectronic devices. Large- and small-signal models
  • Electronic devicesLarge and small-signal models
  • Large and small-signal models of diodes and transistors (MOSFET and BJT)Ideal and non-ideal operational amplifier.
  • Ideal and non-ideal operational amplifierElementary transistor stages:
  • Elementary transistor stages: biasing, operation point, small signal analysis. Design techniques of small-signal amplifiers and their uses in multistage
  • Design techniques of small-signal amplifiers and their uses in multistage amplifiersDifferential pair and
  • Differential pair and differential amplifier
  • Design with operational amplifier. Transconductance amplifier.
  • Active-RC and OTA-C filtersPower amplifiers.
  • Power amplifiers.

Prerequisites: Analog Circuit Analysis (T-306-RAS1) or equivalents.

T-620-FJAX Finance X (6)

In this task students will take on the role of a bond portfolio manager. Initially they will familiarize themselves with the Icelandic bond market and in that process appreciate the following important points:

  • Market conditions that impact on the value of their investments.
  • How do the specifics of a bond impact on its risk-return profile?
  • Work out the correlation between the performances of individual bonds.

The next step is to move on to a portfolio of several bonds, which will be analyzed and optimized from a defined risk-return perspective. It is important to analyze in particular the following aspects,

  • Price, risk and portfolio returns.
  • Quantification of risk for bond portfolios
  • The role of different interest rate models
  • The impact of inflation on portfolios‘ risk and return characteristics
  • The role of inflation – and interest rate contracts

The students will put in place a “life system” that takes in real-time data from the market and updates the value and the risk position of the portfolio. Adjustments will be made to the portfolio as required and an investment policy will be determined and used to rebalance the portfolio. Some attention will be paid to the possible use of interest rate and/or inflation indexed derivatives. The results will be presented in the form of a report and a demonstrator.

Prerequisites: Teachers approval. Admission is restricted to students who are studying in their final year of the BSc program in Financial Engineering.

T-640-FCTA Financial Computer Techniques (3)

The purpose of the course is that students learn to apply financial theory in a practice. The course will present how to approach real world problems by using theory in the spreadsheet environment of Excel (and partly in the coding environment of Visual Basic and Matlab). At completion of the course, students should be comfortable with pricing securities (bonds, stock, derivatives) and perform various types of risk evaluations. Students should also be able to perform term structure estimation, assess fund management performance, present portfolios on the efficient frontier, assess equilibrium price models, etc. In short, the purpose of the course is that students adopt the tools necessary to use financial theory in a practical way which will benefit them in any finance or research related position.

The main topics to be covered in the course are:

  • Interest rate calcul., term structure estim., pricing of bonds, immunization strategies
  • Portfolio theory and choice/management (e.g. efficient frontier)
  • Stock pricing models of finanical markets (e.g. CAPM, Fama-French)
  • Event studies
  • Volatility predictions; standard deviation, MA, EWMA, ARCH, GARCH models
  • Option pricing (European, American, Asian and Bermuda options)
  • Risk measurement; the Value-at-Risk methodlogy and extensions thereof
  • In addition to the spreadsheet environment of Excel, the course will introduce how to apply Visual Basic Application (in Excel) and Matlab to conveniently solve some financial tasks.
  • Introduction to the main financial databases available online and elsewhere.

Prerequisites: The course assumes that students are comfortable with the course material of standard

undergradute finance (portfolio theory, asset pricing, options&derivatives) and statistics (econometrics and statistics) courses. Basic knowledge of Excel is also assumed.

T-803-VERK Project Management and Strategic Planning (3)

Course description currently unavailable. This is a MSc level course, but is open to advanced undergraduate students.

T-806-SST2 Reinforced Concrete II (3)

Course description currently unavailable. This is a MSc level course, but is open to advanced undergraduate students.

T-844-FEMM Finite Element Analysis in Engineering (3)

This course will present the main features and possibilities of the finite element method (FEM) and its application in analysis of problems in mechanics. Aspects of the finite element method, from the mathematical background through to practical implementation and application are discussed. Emphasis is placed on possible errors and how to minimize them. Students will develop an understanding of the fundamentals of the finite element method and get some training in the use of commercial finite element software.

Prerequisites: Statics and Mechanics of Materials (T-106-BURD), Classical Dynamics (T-534-AFLF), or equivalents.

T-845-UMHV Sustainable Engineering and the Environment (3)

Course description currently unavailable.

VT JAH1003 Geothermal Energy (3)
  • Topics covered in this course include:
  • Geothermal systems
  • Geothermal exploration
  • Geothermal well drilling and well design
  • Geothermal well logging and testing of wells
  • Classification of geothermal systemsConceptual models.
  • Conceptual models
  • Response of geothermal systems to utilization
  • Reservoir management and reservoir models
  • Role of geothermal energy in the energy mix
  • Different uses of geothermal energy in Iceland and worldwide
  • Direct use of geothermal energy for space and district heating, swimming pools, greenhouses, snow melting and in industry
  • Geothermal heat pumps
  • Utilization of geothermal steam
  • Geothermal power plants, flash system power plants, binary power plants
  • Design of steam pipelines, structural design, process design
  • Power plant components, turbines, generators, condensers, cooling system, gas extraction system
  • Use of EES program
  • Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS)
  • Environmental effects of geothermal energy

Prerequisites: Thermadynamics (T-507-VARM or VT VAR1003), or equivalents.

T-606-HEAT Heat Transfer (3)

In this course the concepts of heat transfer are introduced:

  • Heat conduction: One dimensional steady state heat conduction, solution of the Fourier equation for steady state and transient problems. Lumped analysis using thermal resistance. Application of numerical techniques.
  • Convective heat transfer: Natural convection, empirical relations in free convection. Forced convection, laminar and turbulent convective heat transfer analysis in external and internal flows, such as flows between parallel plates, over a flat plate and in a circular pipe. Condensation and boiling heat transfer. Empirical relations, application of numerical techniques in problem solving.
  • Radiative heat transfer: Introduction to the physical mechanism, radiation properties, radiation shape factors black body radiation, and deviation from black body radiation, radiation from gases.
  • Heat exchangers: Classification of heat exchangers, temperature distribution, overall heat transfer coefficient, and fouling. Heat exchanger analysis using LMTD method and NTU method.

Prerequisites: Calculus III (T-301-MATH), Thermodynamics (T-507-VARM), Fluid Mechanics (T-536-RENN), or equivalents.

T-407-EFNI Materials Science (3) – MAY BE OFFERED IN ENGLISH OR ICELANDIC

The fundamentals of the properties and structure of materials utilized in the practice of engineering are presented. The groups of materials studied include metals and alloys, ceramics, polymers and multiphase systems. Theoretical basis is given for the understanding of the behavior of materials where their electrical, mechanical, thermal and chemical properties are related to their molecular and crystalline structure. A brief introduction to biomedical applications is given. Methods for analyzing and testing of materials’ properties are studied as well as the methods used for controlling them, e.g. heat treatment, grain refinement and alloying. Corrosion and its prevention are studied and an introduction to binary and ternary phase diagrams is given. An insight into Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and nano-systems is also provided.

Prerequisites: Chemistry T-204-EFNA

T-535-MECH Mechatronics II (3)

Mechatronics-2 extends Mechatronics-1 by going into more details. While Mechatronics 1 is broader and more about getting results fast (what is possible), Mechatronics 2 is more about accuracy and how to match a design to a task with economy, accuracy, and robustness in mind (what is the limit). The course includes sensors, signal conditioning, interfacing, analog-digital conversion, digital input/outputs, timers, low level embedded firmware programming, actuators, UARTs and serial communication. It is expected that the student is familiar with the programming language C. Along with the lectures, each student has his/her own private project based on the fundamental elements of mechatronics: sense-think-act. For this project, the student holds a lab notebook. At the end of the course, the student delivers a report about the project.

Prerequisites: Mechatronics I (T-411-MECH) or equivalent.

T-620-LIKX Model X (6)

This course will help students to make the vital step from solid understanding of the fundamentals of engineering management and operations reasearch to the application of theory to practical scenarios, as they arise in the real world. On completion of the course the students will have extensively applied their knowledge of engineering management to a range of practical and relevant problems. The problems will require knowledge from course such as operations research, programming, data processing, simulation, and production and inventory management.

Prerequisites: Teachers approval. Admission is restricted to students who are studying in their final year of the BSc program in Engineering Management.

 

T-611-NYTI New Technology (3)

The objective of this course is to look at innovations and technology trends, learn from history, and using theories of innovations to study lessons and try to see patterns so we can evaluate new technology currently emerging and interpret the impact. In the course we look at how to keep up to date on technology trends. In particular we will look at communications, wireless devices, mobile phones and the TV, home appliances, the Internet and other consumer devices. The course will discuss what future trends will emerge, which standards and companies will be successful, and the effects that the technology will have on society. As a term project, students will perform research and write a research paper on technology, the possibilities and effect on society.

T-606-NUFF Numerical Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer (3)

The main purpose of this course is to introduce the basic principles of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for analyzing fluid flows and heat transfer. Hands-on exercises are used to study the basic theory of CFD through programming and using existing commercial and open source CFD codes. Finite difference and finite volume techniques are emphasized.

Prerequisites: Fluid Dynamics (T-536-RENN) or Fluids and Heat transfer (VT STV 1003), or equivalents.

T-640-FCTA Financial Computer Techniques (3)

Course description currently unavailable.

 

T-602-RISK Risk Management (3)

This course starts by introducing basic concepts assessing and managing risk. The discussion will then focus on how risk arises, both in corporate and financial environment and on ways to manage it, either by means of active hedging or diversification. Classification of risk will be explained with specific focus on equity -, interest rate – and credit risk. Value-at-risk (VaR) will be introduced as one way of quantifying risk and the KMV model, popular with rating agencies such as Moody’s, will be discussed for quantifying credit risk. For both models we will emphasize their strengths and limitations. The course will also cover risks associated with positions in a range of different derivative contracts and how they can be hedged.

Prerequisites: Calculus (T-101-STA1), Securities (T-303-VERD).

T-508-VARM Thermodynamics (3) – MAY BE OFFERED IN ENGLISH OR ICELANDIC

Topics covered in this course include:

  • Introduction to the fundamental concepts of engineering thermodynamics: State, temperature, etc.
  • The first law of thermodynamics, work, heat, efficiency. Properties of pure substances, phase change, ideal gas, real gas, equations of state.
  • Thermodynamic analysis of open and closed systems e.g. turbines and heat exchangers.
  • Second law and its applications.
  • Reversible and irreversible processes, Carnot cycle etc. Entropy, the Clausius inequality and the third law.
  • Exergy and its applications for analysis.

Prerequisites: Calculus I (T-101-STA1), Physics I (T-102-EDL1).

VT SVF1003 Vibration Theory (3)

Topics covered in this course include:

  • Free, damped and excited vibrations in linear systems
  • Nonlinear vibrations
  • Two-degree-of-freedom systems
  • Design for vibration suppression
  • Measurement and analysis of vibrations
  • The use of the ANSYS program for vibration analysis

Prerequisites: Dynamics (VT AFL1003), Finite Element Analysis (VT FEM1003), or equivalents.

3-WEEK END-OF-SEMESTER COURSES – CHOOSE 1

These intensive, hands-on project-based courses are offered after the exam period, and are worth 3 credits. Students will choose and register for this course on-site. These course options may change between the application period and arrival on-site.

T-420-HONX Design X (3)

Students in this course work in groups on a project that is defined each year. The students’ goal is to design, build, test, and refine subsystems enabling the participation of a RU student team in the 2017 Formula Student competition or similar open-ended interdisciplinary projects.

Examples of past projects include:

  • Rocket
  • “Mars” rovers
  • Autonomous submarine
  • Robot for temperature inspection in aluminum smelter
  • Walking robot for Össur
  • Sound probe for recording whale sounds in sea
  • Formula student race car

Prerequisites:  Teacher approval. Admission into the course is limited and efforts are made to ensure that students with various talents and backgrounds are admitted, in order to create an integral group.