Course Offerings | API Study Abroad
Course Offerings

Highlights

  • Classes taught in English except Hungarian language classes
  • Tandem partner program
  • Volunteer opportunities
  • International excursion

Requirements

  • Minimum 2.5 G.P.A.
  • Students must be currently enrolled in a U.S. or foreign university
  • Open to freshmen (2nd semester), sophomores, juniors and seniors
  • Open to all levels of Hungarian speakers
  • Completed API application
  • University contact information form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • One official transcript
  • Resume/C.V.
  • Copy of passport
  • Additional supplemental materials
  • Entry requirement: valid passport with supporting documents (more information provided post acceptance)

Dates & Fees

FALL SEMESTER 2017-2018
Aug 27, 2017 - Dec 16, 2017
$12,300
SPRING SEMESTER 2018
Jan 28, 2018 - May 19, 2018
$12,300
ACADEMIC YEAR 2017-2018
Aug 27, 2017 - May 19, 2018
$22,600
FALL SEMESTER 2018
Late Aug, 2018 - Mid Dec, 2018
$12,300
ACADEMIC YEAR 2018-2019
Late Aug, 2018 - Late May, 2019
$22,600

Deadlines

FALL SEMESTER 2017-2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
May 1, 2017
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Jun 1, 2017
SPRING SEMESTER 2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Oct 20, 2017
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Nov 15, 2017
ACADEMIC YEAR 2017-2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
May 1, 2017
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Jun 1, 2017
FALL SEMESTER 2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
May 1, 2018
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Jun 1, 2018
ACADEMIC YEAR 2018-2019
APPLICATION DEADLINE
May 1, 2018
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Jun 1, 2018

Course Offerings

If you require syllabi that are not listed below, please contact your API Program Coordinator.

 

THE COURSE NUMBERS CORRESPOND TO THE FOLLOWING LEVELS:

100-299 BEGINNING FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES

300-399 INTERMEDIATE SOPHOMORES AND JUNIORS

400-499 SPECIALIZED JUNIORS AND SENIORS

500-699 ADVANCED SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS

700-799 ADVANCED GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY

The course numbering system is intended to help students select courses that are appropriate for their level of experience. Students may take courses at a level or two above or below their current classification. If a student and their advisor feel that the student meets the requirements for a particular class, the student is encouraged to apply. With proper background, students may also mix and match lower- and upper-level or graduate-level coursework. The sooner students apply, the better the chance at enrolling in their preferred classes.

NOTE: The course selection is subject to change and enrollment in specific courses can only be guaranteed upon formal registration at the university. Some courses may require a minimum enrollment, and not all courses are offered each semester. Some courses may have prerequisites. In these cases, equivalent coursework and/or experience may be considered. API recommends that students obtain pre-approval for all of their course selections and alternates prior to departure.

TRACKS

API and Corvinus University have worked together to bundle some of the many courses available into comprehensive tracks by competency area. Two such areas that Corvinus University is well-known for are marketing and finance. Courses in these tracks have been pre-selected to include core modules that follow U.S. curriculum to be both more challenging and directly applicable to marketing and finance degree plans. Upon completion of the term, the student will receive a certificate of completion along with their academic transcript.

Students who are more interested in choosing from a variety of course options are still welcome to do so through the ‘free elective’ track.

Students will indicate their track preference shortly after acceptance. Those selecting the marketing or finance tracks will be automatically registered in those respective courses prior to arrival on site. Those selecting the free elective track will complete online registration prior to arrival.

MARKETING TRACK

Courses in the Marketing Track are as follows:

  • 432_4320VTE International Marketing (Fall) [Syllabus]
  • IEC 483 Tourism and Management Marketing (Fall or Spring) [Syllabus]
  • MAR 524 Consumer Behavior (Fall) [Syllabus]
  • LNG 105 Hungarian for Beginners (Fall or Spring) [Syllabus]
  • BUS 499 Corporate Social Responsibility (Fall or Spring – may replace 1 marketing course) [Syllabus]
  • MAR 523 Services Marketing (Fall or Spring) [Syllabus]
  • MAR 572 Advertising Management (Spring) [Syllabus]

FINANCE TRACK

Courses in the Finance Track are as follows:

  • FIN 351 Corporate Finance (Fall or Spring) [Syllabus]
  • FIN 651 Corporate Financing Policy (Fall) [Syllabus]
  • FIN 754 Multinational Financial Management (Fall) [Syllabus]
  • LNG 105 Hungarian for Beginners (Fall or Spring) [Syllabus]
  • BUS 499 Corporate Social Responsibility (Fall or Spring – may replace 1 finance course) [Syllabus]
  • FIN 451 Financing Policy (Spring) [Syllabus]
  • FIN 551 Investment Analysis (Spring) [Syllabus]

FREE ELECTIVE TRACK

Students may select 4-5 courses from any of the disciplines listed (subject to availability and pre-requisites).

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

LANGUAGE COURSES

HUNGARIAN

The Hungarian for Beginners course is required for all students who have not previously studied Hungarian. Students may then choose three or four of the spring or fall courses listed on the following pages. A sixth course may be added for an extra fee.

LNG 105 Hungarian for Beginners – FALL & SPRING SEMESTERS (3) REQUIRED – Conducted in Hungarian [Syllabus]

The course is offered for students who want to acquire a basic command of the Hungarian language which would help them to obtain simple information and to express their requests and/or messages in a simple form. The course is also recommended for students who need only so-called “survival Hungarian”.

LNG 206 Hungarian for Intermediate Students – SPRING SEMESTER (3) – Conducted in Hungarian

This course is for students who possess basic grammatical, vocabulary and comprehension skills and are able to conduct simple conversations. Following an assessment of the students’ needs, the course will place a strong emphasis on communication skills, using the forum of different situations in which they may have to act and express themselves. The main objective of the course is to enable students to interact in everyday situations by providing communication patterns while developing their vocabulary in situational dialogues. The understanding of simple newspaper texts and conversation on a basic level about such topics as arts and political events are also in the syllabus for the term. The new grammar (sequence of tenses, compound sentences, structures with infinitive, participles) will allow the students to use newly acquired vocabulary more appropriately. Prerequisites: This course is offered to students who possess basic grammatical, vocabulary and comprehension skills and are able to conduct simple conversations. A minimum enrollment of 5 students is required for this class to be offered.

SPRING COURSES

In addition to the required Hungarian for Beginners course, students may choose three or four courses for the spring semester from the following course list. A sixth course may be added for an extra fee.

HUMANITIES COURSES

ART

ART 300 Contemporary Literature, Film, and Visual Arts in Hungary (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The aim of the course is to present how the recent history of Hungary is reflected in literature, film and visual arts. The course if offering an overview of the twentieth-century history of Hungary, as well as an outline of how art is reflecting on key historical events. During the course we are going to look for traces of history in the urban spaces of Budapest, we will visit important locations and intriguing institutions. We will also discuss issues contemporary works of art raise, and their critical societal visions. The course aims to achieve its goals through the implementation of an intermediate and interdisciplinary view.

ART 302 Fields and Scenes: Reading the Arts, Culture and Design (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The course provides an overview of how cultural fields are shaped and constructed from the perspective of the classics of scholarship on cultural production and art, taking stock of the current trends and interpretations of how cultural organizations, the art markets, and culture beyond markets work. A particular focus is given to innovation/ experimentation. Theoretic claims are illustrated with cases of different fields of design, art, and cultural production, from the performing arts, toward the formation of music scenes, and community-based initiatives shaping the architecture and the cultural-social urban texture. Field visits (an independent radio station, cultural and community centers, and an ‘underground plaza’) are planned during the course for developing a toolkit for researching and understanding players, scenes, and (sub)cultures.

Prerequisites: basic knowledge of markets, culture, and society.

ART 305 Budapest – Explorations of the Urban Space (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The aim of the course is to explore the aspects of urban space and city life in Budapest. Urban spaces evolve as the intersections of anthropological, sociological, historical, political, economical, artistic etc. discourses. The goal of our course is to find out about these layers and aspects and to gain first-hand experience through organized city walks. By going on tours and strolls in Budapest we will learn about the history, culture, the multi-ethnic and ideological complexity of this city, as they are articulated, shaped and preserved in the contemporary urban space.

HISTORY

HIS 352 Film and History (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course is designed as a general survey of the history of Central Europe in the 20th century to enable students to understand current events and their historical background. The focus will be primarily on Central Europe and special attention will be paid to events and trends in Hungarian history in the 20th century, from the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy to the fall of the Soviet bloc. Special attention will be paid to visual representation and to understanding historical events, trends and personalities through film analysis.

HIS 445 History of Modern Europe (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course aims to provide an overview of the history of twentieth-century Europe. A focus will be laid on Central Europe, in particular, Hungary, and on the way how major West European states (France, Great Britain, Germany) and the superpowers (the USA, former the Soviet Union) influenced and shaped political and economic developments in Central and East Central Europe. We will cover two distinct time spans. The first will cover the period 1890 to 1945. Topics will be the Wilsonian concept of self-determination creating nation-states after the Great War (and replacing multinational ones like the Habsburg Empire) and the end of democratic rule coinciding with revisionism, the rise of authoritarian rule and political extremism. The second time span will cover the period 1945 to present. It starts with the decisive role of the United States and the Soviet Union in establishing a distinct political and economic order in post-war and Cold War Europe. It introduces major political forces in Western Europe and questions the legitimacy of one-party rule in East Central Europe. It deals with the economic policies and integration of Western Europe pre-1989, the end of communist rule in Eastern Europe, and the political integration efforts of a continent that is no more divided within the framework of the European Union.

LAW

LAW 462 Introduction to Legal Theory (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course deals with the legal system as the set of principles and standards of conduct, as well as the law as a ruling system governing the society and having general application for it. Main topics of the course are the basic problems of legal reasoning as the characteristics of Law. During the course, we will examine the law as a system of norms, accompanied by state sanctions, the process of lawmaking, the legal sources, legal norms, legal relationships, the court system, the institutional court, the hierarchy of norms, the role of the constitution. An important goal is to compare the world’s two great legal systems: the Continental and the Anglo-Saxon. One task of the course is also to give a short picture about the most important branches of the law. The Contract Law part includes explication of the offer and the acceptance; the consideration; the parties to the Contract and the major contractual rights and obligations. The Corporation Law part covers the business organization types, formation, and management questions. Labour Law issues shall be dealt with in the course for all management issues are at the same time Labour law issues as well. This will include employment contract and management liability.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POL 301– International Debate (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The class will act as committees of the United Nations, with the main aim of discussing, researching, and voting upon strict matters of UN policy and activities. Students will represent various countries during debates and will be tasked with upholding “their” nation’s interest during meetings.

POL 377 International Relations – 1945 to Present (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course gives a broad overview of international relations since 1945. It traces the major political, economic, and ideological patterns that have evolved in the global arena from the end of World War II to the present day. The course will consist of five parts: the West and the Cold War; the Soviet orbit; the end of colonialism and Third World nationalisms; global power: from a bipolar to a multipolar order; and the global South and emerging powers. The course will start with the date 1945 and the emergence of the two superpowers, how the Cold War was institutionalized in the forms of confrontation and coexistence. The class will continue with the consolidation of one party rule in the Soviet Union and East Central Europe, and the outreach of the socialist ideology to the developing world (cases are Poland, Hungary, as well as Egypt and India). Decolonization in Asia and Africa that came in violent and non-violent forms will form the third part of the course. (cases Indochina, Algeria, sub-Saharan Africa). In this part, the class will also cover the Arab-Israeli conflict. The fourth part covers the collapse of communism and the partly violent transition to multiparty rule in East Central Europe (cases Poland, Hungary, Yugoslavia). The class finishes with the rise of new economic powers and a shift towards a multipolar order. Cases are the role of today’s USA, the rise of China, and the challenges of the global South.

POL 386 European Union Politics (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course will provide an overview of the European integration process since 1945. The focus will be on West European integration in the form of the European Communities (1945-90) and since the end of communism on the inclusion of Central and Eastern Europe in an – to use the wording of the Treaty of Rome – “ever closer Union” of European nation-states (1990 to present).

PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 311 Personality Types and Team Dynamics (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

No matter where you work in a company, no matter what you do, you are a part of a team. Today’s business leaders must gain insight into individual differences and team dynamics in order to maximize talents, reframe potential sources of misunderstanding, and facilitate collaboration. What energizes you? How do you acquire information? How do you make decisions? How do you interact with your environment? The answers to these questions will have significant implications for cultivating effective team culture, communication, and selling strategies, decision-making, problem-solving and conflict resolution, leadership, and approaches for organizational change in the business environment. The theory of human typology, based on Carl Jung’s research, has given a scientific and effective understanding of human preferences and behavior. One of the most researched and used personality or “human style” assessments in the world is the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) based on Jung’s theory. This course will cover these and other theories of personality.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COURSES

BUSINESS

BUS 435 Business Enterprise – Startup to SME (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course covers the characteristics students would need to develop to be successful in business and how new or existing businesses generate their product or service ideas and test them through market research. Students should also consider the competition in the market; the economic climate; how the business might be financed and how much revenue the idea might generate.

BUS 436 SME Marketing (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

Students in this course will be expected to study and understand marketing theory and practice, and more importantly, learn how to apply their marketing knowledge and skills to real-life problem-solving situations by creating marketing action plans for SME organizations.

BUS 439 Business Policy and Strategy (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The strategic-management process can be described as an objective, logical, systematic approach for making major decisions in an organization. It attempts to organize qualitative and quantitative information in a way that allows effective decisions to be made under conditions of uncertainty. Yet, strategic management is not a pure science that lends itself to a nice, neat, one-two-three approach.

Based on past experiences, judgment, and feelings, intuition is essential to making good strategic decisions. Intuition is particularly useful for making decisions in situations of great uncertainty or little precedent. Although some organizations today may survive and prosper because they have intuitive geniuses managing them, most are not so fortunate. Most organizations can benefit from strategic management, which is based upon integrating intuition and analysis in decision making. Choosing an intuitive or analytic approach to decision making is not an either-or proposition. Managers at all levels in an organization inject their intuition and judgment into strategic-management analyses. Analytical thinking and intuitive thinking complement each other.

BUS 453 International Business Case Studies (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

Increasingly, enterprises of all types are required to compete in multiple foreign markets. Understanding the challenges associated with global business activity, and developing skills in these areas, have become essential requirements for success. The International Business course is designed to provide students with the skills, knowledge, and sensitivity required to work within a global environment.

The course will involve several different teaching styles. Involvement will be both in an individual format and in teams of up to five people. The class will include formal lectures, case and class presentations, guest speakers and videos. Although a formal schedule is included, students should be aware, as in international business, things can change with minimal notice.

Each of the assignments has its own requirements that must be adhered to and are included in the description of those assignments. Much of the ultimate learning and enjoyment from this course will depend on the initiative demonstrated by individual students during class discussions.

The course addresses issues in the strategy, organization marketing, and management of companies operating in the global market. In addition, the course will integrate the sciences of geography and history along with individual country flags and on-going current events. It is assumed students, through the completion of the prerequisite and other relevant courses in marketing, are familiar with the key concepts in international business and marketing research and planning.

Case studies used in this course will help you develop your analytical and decision-making skills and also highlight the reality of environmental uncertainties influencing decision making in the global context. Cases also seek to develop your capacity to identify issues, to reason carefully through various options and improve your ability to manage the organizational process by which decisions get formed and executed. In addition to case analyses, we will also read and discuss additional articles on strategic issues relevant to operating in a global context. Thus, students will develop both, historical and current, and theoretical and practical, perspectives on operating in a global context.

BUS 498 Business Ethics (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

Business is a term representing the activity of commercial production and exchange between the various persons in our modern commercial society. That activity and exchange necessarily take place among and between persons and therefore have an ethical dimension.

This course therefore aims to:

  1. Familiarize students with basic philosophical concepts and principles of ethics
  2. Develop the skill of using these concepts and principles to understand and analyze the ethical dimensions of everyday business practices
  3. Sensitize the students to the broad range of moral issues that can arise in modern business
  4. Help students become more aware of their own moral beliefs as well as the beliefs of others, and to make them more articulate and thoughtful in the expression and discussion of moral issues 
BUS 499 Corporate Social Responsibility (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

Via dozens of corporate examples, by applying a great variety of exercises, through the diverse lenses of numerous stakeholders let’s discuss how socially and ecologically responsible businesses do/could work. The aim of this course is to provide a meaty and creative environment for teasing ideas on the controversies and complexity of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), Social Entrepreneurship plus other trendy and sensual buzzwords of this field.

Students learn about the diverse background of CSR (corporate philanthropy, business ethics, strategic management, etc.), the various existing – and often competing – approaches to this management concept by looking at best and worst business examples. By listening to guest speakers and seeing the results of most recent research we understand the trends and nature of the “industry” around CSR.  Students practice the preparation and evaluation of CSR actions and tools.  The course also provides and the opportunity to meet real-life professionals of CSR.

BUS 780 Strategic Management (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

Weighing the ins and outs of crafting, implementing, and executing company strategies forces a total enterprise perspective, demands that many internal and external situational considerations be dealt with at once, and calls for judgments about how all the relevant factors add up. This trait is what makes strategic management an integrative course. The center of attention is the total enterprise–-the industry and competitive environment in which it operates, its long-term direction and strategy, its resources and competitive capabilities, and its prospects for success.

Throughout the course, the spotlight will be trained on the foremost issue in running a business enterprise: “What must managers do, and do well, to make the company a winner in the game of business?” The answer that emerges, and which becomes the theme of the course, is that good strategy-making and good strategy execution are the key ingredients of company success and the most reliable signs of good management. The mission of the course is to explore why good strategic management leads to good business performance, to present the basic concepts and tools of strategic analysis, and to drill you in the methods of crafting a well-conceived strategy and executing it competently. Videos and case studies in order to develop students’ capacity to think strategically about a company, its present business position, its long-term direction, its resources and competitive capabilities, the caliber of its present strategy, and its opportunities for gaining sustainable competitive advantage.

ECONOMICS

ECO 136 Macroeconomics (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course will provide an overview of macroeconomic issues: the determination of output, unemployment, inflation and growth. Monetary and fiscal policies are also discussed. It introduces basic models of macroeconomics and illustrates principles using real-life examples

Knowledge of macroeconomic principles is essential for understanding affairs in the modern world. Not only do people encounter macroeconomic issues in the newspapers daily, but they do can feel their effects on their standards of living.

The immediate objective of this course is to develop a structured way of thinking to understand and analyze macroeconomic and policy issues. Macroeconomics applies many often-heard concepts – income, consumption, investment, etc. – to construct a framework of the functioning of the economy as a whole. This course introduces the principles of macroeconomics together with real-life examples since the aim of the course is to give a better understanding of real-life trends.

Prerequisites: Microeconomics

ECO 305 Globalization (Economic Theory)  (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The activity and exchange between the economy and society necessarily take place among and between people and therefore have an ethical dimension. But the complexity of politics, economy and social interaction in the global environment, as well as the rapid changes in different settings and practices caused by global changes (such as technological and cultural changes) often make it very difficult for us to perceive ethical issues in cultural globalization and to know how to deal with them.

ECO 395 Economics and the European Union (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The aims of this course are as follows:

  1. To enable students to gain a comprehensive insight into the workings of the European Union and the place of member nations within it.
  2. To equip students with the required knowledge, skills, and abilities to permit them to proceed, if desired, to further specialist studies.

The objectives of this course are as follows:

  1. To develop awareness and understanding of the European Union by providing students, through lectures, seminars and case studies, with a comprehensive insight into the workings of the European Union and the place of member nations within it.
  2. To enable students to demonstrate an understanding of developments, past, present, and future, impacting upon the economy of the European Union by exploring:
    • its background – origins, evolution, structure;
    • key areas of its economy, and;
    • the main planks of economic policy.
ECO 411 The Economics and the Ethics of Globalization (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

“Learning the practices and consequences of managing ethically in the changing cultural, economic, political, technological, in a global environment.” This course examines the norms or principles that establish and justify societies and determine the rights and responsibilities of a society in a globalized world. Furthermore, we will analyze, what is the responsibility of individuals in relation to each other and to society as a whole, and of a society in relation to other societies. The course will consider the application of these principles to such issues as justice, ethics, political, and social institutions, in a world community. The class is, first and foremost, a course about ethics and economics in a globalized world. It is also a class designed with a heavy emphasis on reading, writing, and class participation.

ECO 415 Transition and Post-Transition Challenges in Hungary (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The quick disintegration of the planned economy led to a regime change in Central Eastern Europe after the fall of the Berlin wall in 1989, opening the road for the whole region to integrate into Western economic, political and security systems. This transition has, however, proved to be uneven, painful and unpopular. The course aims at analyzing the particular Hungarian regime change events and the transition process that evolved once the country left behind the former political system. Hungary was seen as a leading reformer in the early 1990s, and as a natural candidate to join the European integration among the very firsts, yet at present Hungary – already an EU member state – struggles with economic slowdown, persistent inflation, problems in public finance, and a certain `adjustment fatigue`.

FINANCE

FIN 156 Basic Finance (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

Utilizing the “big picture” approach, the course begins with the 10 fundamental principles that drive financial decision-making. It explores the existence of financial markets and the crucial role these markets and instruments play in the financing of businesses.

Students will be introduced to basic financial mathematics through an in-depth discussion on the time value of money, where they are expected to have a good grasp of present and future values as well as handle calculations on annuities, perpetuities and uneven cash flows. The course will extend this newly acquired knowledge of financial mathematics to the valuation of stocks and bonds, including the variants of these instruments and markets, as well as the determinants of their values.

The final section explores the relationship between risk and return; and how the risks are statistically determined and mitigated through portfolio diversification. Of particular importance for the students is the understanding of beta and applications of the capital asset pricing model in the risk-return trade-off. A financial calculator may be required for this course.

Prerequisites: a basic knowledge of microeconomics and statistics.

FIN 351 Corporate Finance I (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The aim of the course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the principles and techniques of Corporate Finance and applying them to the main decisions faced by the financial manager. The concepts are immediately applicable to all firms, both large or small, privately run or publicly traded and involved in any industry – whether manufacturing, retail or service.

The course is divided into 3 main sections, beginning with the concept of valuation where topics covering time value of money and the valuation of income streams, share and bond valuations will be discussed. The course will thereafter extend these principles in the second section to provide an in-depth discussion and critical analysis of the various techniques used in investment appraisal decisions: Net Present Value, Internal Rate of Return, Payback Period. These techniques will be applied to more complex investment proposals, including choices between alternative projects, investment timing decisions, and decisions on whether to invest. The final section explores the relationship between risk and return, diversifiable and non-diversifiable risks, and beta through the use of the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM) to determine the Weighted Average Cost of Capital that financial managers use as a hurdle rate for project evaluation in order to achieve the ultimate aim of maximizing the value of the firm. A financial calculator may be required for this course.

Prerequisites: FIN 156 Basic Finance or a basic knowledge of Microeconomics, Financial Accounting, and Statistics.

FIN 451 Corporate Finance II (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

Students will be introduced to the other cornerstone of Corporate Financial decision-making:  Capital Structure and the proportions of debt and equity financing that companies should adopt.  We will begin our study with the famous theoretical propositions of Modigliani and Miller and analyze its applications to real world scenarios.  The course will dwell in much detail to the discussion of how companies evaluate between the choices of internal and external financing; how they plan and manage working capital and short-term financing and the basis of share repurchase and dividend policies. And finally, in the light of the financial knowledge gleaned in this course, we will proceed to understand and apply, in our concluding lectures, the topic of mergers, acquisitions, and corporate control. A financial calculator may be required for this course.

Prerequisites: FIN 351 Corporate Finance I, FIN 156 Basic Finance, and have a good knowledge of Microeconomics, Financial Accounting, and Statistics.

FIN 551 Investment Analysis (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course takes the viewpoint of you, as an investor, faced with a plethora of investment choices from which you decide your own investment portfolio. It will provide you with a rigorous grounding in the methods and tools of investment appraisal used by financial analysts as well as introduce the systematic techniques of portfolio selection and management, which are critical in determining the overall investment performance of the portfolio.

In addition, the course will adopt a practical approach by highlighting during course discussions the major real-world issues of concern to all investors. It also aims to hone the skills necessary to conduct a sophisticated assessment of the current issues and debates covered by the popular media as well as more specialized finance journals. A financial calculator may be required for this course.

Prerequisites: Students should have taken at least 3 prior courses in finance. This course requires a good knowledge of Corporate Finance (including the valuation of cashflows, time value of money, annuities, and perpetuities), Microeconomics, Financial Accounting, and Statistics.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

COM 534 Intelligent Systems (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]
  • Intelligent systems course provides a comprehensive, up-to-date guide to today’s revolutionary management support system technologies, and it demonstrates how they can be used for better decision making. The course takes the perspective of a general manager rather than a computer programmer, systems analyst or a computer scientist. The most important management support systems, such as data warehousing, business analytics, data mining, business performance management systems, knowledge management technologies and artificial intelligence methods are discussed and demonstrated.
    The course has three major objectives:
    to highlight the theoretical background of the intelligent systems;
  • to demonstrate students the tools necessary for understanding the features of intelligent
    systems
  • to offer practical experiences about the application of different intelligent systems.
COM 728 Management Information Systems (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course provides a good understanding of the role of information technology in the modern organization. It covers the most important areas where a manager can come across information systems. Information management will be introduced in the sense of managing information as a strategic resource. Typical applications that support organizations and managerial work are introduced. Additionally, information strategy planning will be discussed in the context of strategic planning. Development/ acquisition of information systems, implementation-related problems, the management and security issues of IT are also key topics. Students following the course will be able to understand the most important aspects of applied informatics and its interrelations with other management areas.

MANAGEMENT

MAN 300 Management (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The purpose of the course is to provide students with knowledge of the fundamentals of management, including basic concepts and terminology. Business firms around the world are experimenting with new organizational designs, changing their routines and processes as they seek to improve their current performance and their growth prospects. In the process they change the scope of their business operations, redraw their organization charts, redefine the allocation of decision- making authority and responsibility, and reconsider which activities to conduct in-house and which to outsource. The course introduces students with powerful conceptual frameworks for analysing the interrelations between organizational design features, competitive strategy and the business environment. Students will spend a significant portion of their time diagnosing the fit and misfits between various elements on the basis of open system theory. Specifically, it is the intent of this course to blend theory with practice, requiring students to observe the business environment, and actively applying concepts to the “real world”.

MAN 421 New Product Management (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The world is overloaded with new products and services and making a new offering stand out is a difficult task. Along with the management approach, the perspective of marketing is presented throughout enabling the student to have a balanced view of presenting new products in a competitively global market place.
The course will involve several different teaching styles. Involvement will be both in an individual format and in teams of up to five people. The class will include formal lectures, case and class presentations, guest speakers and videos. Although a formal schedule is included, students should be aware, as in international business, things can change with
minimal notice.
Each of the assignments has its own requirements that must be adhered to and are included in the description of those assignments. Much of the ultimate learning and enjoyment from this course will depend on the initiative demonstrated by individual students during class discussions.
Case studies used in this course will help you develop your analytical and decision-making skills and also highlight the reality of environmental uncertainties influencing decision making in the global context. Cases also seek to develop your capacity to identify issues, to reason carefully through various options and improve your ability to manage the organizational process by which decisions get formed and executed. In addition to case analyses we will also read and discuss additional articles on strategic issues relevant to operating in a global context. Thus, students will develop both, historical and current, and theoretical and practical perspectives on operating in a global context.

MAN 479 Environmental Management (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course is planned for students who, while not specialists in environmental issues, would like to receive insight into causes of environmental problems and the possible corrective actions that can be taken at the company level. To start, topics of sustainability, environmental policy, and instruments of environmental economics will be explained. We indicate how environmental policy is needed to correct market distortions caused by externalities, and corporate profitability and long-term survival is also influenced by this policy. Environmental strategies can support business strategy and competitiveness provided they are properly chosen. We analyze the environmental strategy options of firms and selection of environmental tools that exist in the corporate toolbox, together with the circumstances that influence the correct choice among strategies and tools. The “greenest” is not necessarily the best for all kinds of companies.

Students will:

  • Gain a broad understanding of environmental issues that affect businesses
  • Understand concepts such as Sustainable Development and it’s relation to the corporate sector
  • Be able to identify and analyses the drivers behind the choice of corporate environmental strategy
  • Be able to define the application, benefits, and drawbacks of the most commonly-used corporate environmental tools
  • Be better positioned to critically analyze corporate behavior in relation to the environment
MAN 481 Organizational Behavior (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This purpose of this course is to provide the student with theories and concepts to enable understanding of the behavior of individuals, groups, and organizations in today’s global business environment. The interactions between elements of the organization as well as personality, leadership, motivation, job satisfaction, individual performance to achieve organizational effectiveness will be explored. Prerequisites: Some academic knowledge of human resources and behavior, strategic management or general and international business. Knowledge of sociology and social psychology facilitate the learning outcome.

IEC 483 Tourism Management and Marketing (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

There will be an analysis of the policy and stakeholder frameworks for tourism that govern its management on an international, regional and local scale, as well as the business and industry decisions that affect its development. The course will focus on some of the impacts of tourism, especially in countries which are economically dependent on tourism. This will include an overview of the tools and techniques that are used to manage and market tourism in a range of environments, the relationship between tourists and local residents, and the role of tourist behavior and education. There will be a focus on destination management, sustainable and ethical tourism, as well as some of the forms of new technology (e.g. e-tourism) which facilitate the management and marketing of tourism.

MAN 485 Human Resource Management (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

Effective Human Resources Management is necessary to gain true competitive advantage in the marketplace. Today companies face several challenges such as sustainability, technology, and globalization. This Course will attempt to bring these challenges to life by highlighting real-world examples pertaining to these issues and relating them to the theoretical concepts.

Students will be provided with the technical background needed to be a knowledgeable consumer of human resource products and services, to manage HR effectively, or to be a successful HR professional. Above all, the Course will emphasize how managers can more effectively acquire, develop, compensate, and manage the internal and external environment that relates to the management of human resources. Much attention will be given to the strategic use of HR Management and its evolvement across borders and cultures.

MAN 587 Introduction to Hospitality Management (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course will provide an overview of the evolution, the current makeup and the size of the hospitality industry. Career opportunities will be discussed. Hospitality trends, globalization, product segmentation, and branding will be analyzed. The different hotel types and their distribution channels will be examined, and hotel performance measures, financial reports will be scrutinized. Specific sales and marketing techniques will be introduced and applied to market segments and booking channels. Ethics in the Global Distribution System and the Internet will be discussed. There will be a heavy emphasis on hospitality sales, marketing, and revenue management techniques in the class material. Case studies, presentations and discussions of today’s hospitality trends will make up most of the itinerary of the seminars.

MAN 669 Management Skills (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

Effective skills in interpersonal communication are essential for the successful working career.The ability to be in command of one’s own life, to relate well to other people and to be able to lead others in a positive direction is a valuable commodity in the changing time in which we live.The pace of living is fast and the need for adapting to change is more important than ever before. The measure of one’s success depends largely on their dealings with other people and their ability to adapt to changing environment. This course is designed to provide an introduction to interpersonal skills theories and help students to identify ways of applying these to their own work life.

The course is intended to introduce theories and practices of different areas and functions that are necessary to become a successful manager. The subject covers important issues of management, such as self-awareness, team-building, stress management, crisis management, conflict handling, negotiation strategies and tactics, communication and persuasion skills and managerial decision making, including creative techniques. The major aim is not only to teach the relevant theoretical background of the above issues but to practice how they can be applied in organizations, in real life situations. Hence the frame of reference is the organization with its complexities and varieties of individuals and subsystems.

MAN 672 Global Business Strategy (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The purpose of Global Business Strategy course is for the students to change the perspective from a traditional home-base view to an international, even global frame- work. Here we will deal with the strategy of developing your business on an international scale either with just a sales and marketing strategy for products and services on the on hand or a total transformation of a company into a global player with a different functional headquarters in different continents. both examples are the extreme end of a spectrum and the usual solution is in between. We will not focus only on the international sales and marketing as our business only. Contrary we will have an extensive look into transforming people, production, and processes into an internationalized company operating in different continents across very different market cultures. Some parts of the course will relate to important concepts and information, while others involve skills-building. Therefore intercultural communication, change management, decision making and ethical implications will become part of the course. The center of attention is the total enterprise–-the industry and competitive environment in which it operates, its long-term direction and strategy, its resources and competitive capabilities, and its prospects for success. We will introduce the St.Gall management model of holistic and cross-functional integrating management.

MAN 781 Organization Behavior and Design (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course is intended to introduce theories and practices of different areas and functions that are necessary for becoming a successful manager. The subject covers 3 levels of the study of Organizational Behavior: first the individual level, secondly the group level and finally the level of the whole organization. Important issues of management will be discussed, such as motivation, leadership, group processes, decision-making, conflict-handling, organizational structure and design, corporate culture, etc. The major aim of the subject is not only to teach the relevant theoretical background of the above issues, but to focus on their interrelatedness, and discuss how this knowledge can be applied in organizations.

INT HRM – International Human Resource Management (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course is an introductory course to Master level students, who plan to work as managers in multinational environment in the future. On completion of this subject, students should have an understanding of the main systems of HRM and current issues of international human resources management; have an understanding of human aspects of companies operating in a multinational environment; learn some practical aspects of managing expatriates’ life.

MARKETING

MAR 370 Marketing (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the strategic principles and the role of marketing within the modern corporation. The focus will be on analyzing and integrating elements of the marketing program and developing marketing decisions. It introduces the major concepts of marketing and the role of marketing in the 21st century through a managerial orientation and analytical approach.The course is a combination of lectures and seminars which highlight and discuss some important concepts from the text but cannot cover all the parts of the chapter you are expected to know. The lectures will tend to expand upon the chapter material presenting new perspectives and real-world illustrations.

MAR 523 Services Marketing (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The service sector of the world economy is huge and still growing. Many services have always been present to some degree, but the complexity and diversity of services have increased dramatically over the past 50 years. In economic terms, the service sector now accounts for about 58% of the gross national product of the world, while in 1980 it was only 20 %. All of the developed economies now have large service sectors and many service firms operate internationally.

This course will highlight the fundamental differences between goods and services focusing on the managerial implications. An overview will be provided on service operations including service related issues on innovation, communication, pricing, physical environment and managing people. A strong emphasis is placed on e-business applications.

MAR 572 Advertising Management (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course focuses on advertising management rather than on principles. The main emphasis is placed on the advertising decision-maker and not on the agency. The course is designed to help the student to achieve an understanding of advertising as part of an overall marketing strategy and as part of the overall communication mix; to understand the basic elements of advertising decision-making, their underlying conceptual structure and theoretical basis; and to provide knowledge and a framework with which to make more effective advertising decisions. Prerequisite: An advanced marketing course or approval of the instructor.

INT MAR International Marketing (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course addresses global issues and describes concepts relevant to all international marketers. An environmental/cultural approach to international marketing will be in the focus of the course. The course is designed to provide students with an understanding of different cultures and the role of cultural differences in international marketing practices. It helps students appreciate the issues, problems, and challenges inherent in cultural differences and their effects on international marketing strategies.

The objective of the course is to make students understand how the elements of the macro-environment influence the companies’ marketing activities abroad. One of the main objectives is to understand the key characteristics of various country markets and how to develop marketing plans in diverse environments. Throughout the course, a variety of country markets in various regions of the world will be discussed and a variety of different types of products and services will be addressed.

CRO CUL Cross-Cultural Communication and Marketing (3) [Syllabus]

In the first part of the semester (until the midterm) the focus of the course will be on discussing cultures, different theories of culture, country images, stereotypes and on analyzing specific countries from different points of view. Participants coming from various countries will introduce their own culture throughout the semester.

In the second part of the semester – based on the concepts learned in the first part – students will practice how to use this knowledge in evaluating companies’ international marketing activities and formulating intercultural marketing strategies.

MATHEMATICS/RESEARCH COURSES

OPERATIONS RESEARCH

OPR 212 Decision Techniques (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

Dealing with individual and organizational decision-making issues, this course addresses the practical aspects of decision making. It provides a multidisciplinary approach to the various organizational contexts where managers work. Problem structuring, modeling, decision making and its techniques will be considered, with specific emphasis on their practical aspects. The course will emphasize less the quantitative methods, instead explores the rational, emotional and group dynamic background.

The course will examine how decision theory, originally developed as a theory for individual decision-making, can be applied to group and organizational decision making processes. The implementation difficulties which are part of the decision-making process will be discussed as well. This course is intended for students in the various management disciplines.

OPR 313 Operations Management (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course introduces a series of areas of management concern and the tools and techniques to analyze them and to make good decisions for the firm based on the analysis. The focus of the course is on recognizing the tools that are appropriate for each situation and on mastering the use of the tools for analytical purposes. On completion of the course, the student should be able to identify, isolate, and critically analyze the individual and holistic systems within a business system or entity. He/she would be able to utilize the tools taught to address and modify existing processes, or where appropriate create and design new process flows for efficient operations.

Prerequisites: Basic course in Economics, Finance, Management

OPR 517 Decision Making Skills (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course consists of two major subjects: 1) decision theory, and 2) decision support systems. Therefore, the course addresses both the theoretical and practical processes and skills of decision-making from the individual to organizational and social levels. It starts with a short historical introduction, which helps in understanding the relationship of decision theory and decision support, followed by a primarily problem-centered approach to the subject, with a number of examples and different applications. It examines issues in personal decision-making, looking at how we can describe the process involved in forming judgments, planning actions and evaluating their consequences, what happens in social decision-making when people have conflicting objectives, and how risk is managed. Techniques for aiding decision-making are explored and ways in which decision support systems may be embedded in the decision-making processes are investigated.

OPR 518 Project Management (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The most characteristic feature of an organization is changing. The direction of change is set by the organizational strategy while the means of achieving the strategic objectives are projects and project management. Thus, long-term success of an organization requires successful projects. Based on these considerations, the course encompasses scope definition; stakeholder management; time, resources and cost assessment; risk assessment; project organizations; project control; project termination; project implementation strategy; pre-qualification and bid ranking; project management methodologies. The primary aim of the course is to develop knowledge, skill, and attitude regarding the above-mentioned PM toolkit and dealing with projects.

FALL COURSES

In addition to the required Hungarian for Beginners class (for 3 U.S. semester credits), students may choose 3-4 courses for the fall semester from the following courses. A sixth course may be added for an extra fee.

HUMANITIES COURSES

ART

ART 300 Contemporary Literature, Film, and Visual Arts in Hungary (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The aim of the course is to present how the recent history of Hungary is reflected in literature, film and visual arts. The course if offering an overview of the twentieth-century history of Hungary, as well as an outline of how art is reflecting on key historical events. During the course we are going to look for traces of history in the urban spaces of Budapest, we will visit important locations and intriguing institutions. We will also discuss issues contemporary works of art raise, and their critical societal visions. The course aims to achieve its goals through the implementation of an intermedial and interdisciplinary view.

ART 302 Fields and Scenes: Reading the Arts, Culture and Design (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The course provides an overview of how cultural fields are shaped and constructed from the perspective of the classics of scholarship on cultural production and art, taking stock of the current trends and interpretations of how cultural organizations, the art markets, and culture beyond markets work. A particular focus is given to innovation/ experimentation. Theoretic claims are illustrated with cases of different fields of design, art, and cultural production, from the performing arts, toward the formation of music scenes, and community-based initiatives shaping the architecture and the cultural-social urban texture. Field visits (an independent radio station, cultural and community centers, and an ‘underground plaza’) are planned during the course for developing a toolkit for researching and understanding players, scenes, and (sub)cultures.

ART 305 Budapest – Explorations of the Urban Space (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The aim of the course is to explore the aspects of urban space and city life in Budapest. Urban spaces evolve as the intersections of anthropological, sociological, historical, political, economical, artistic etc. discourses. The goal of our course is to find out about these layers and aspects and to gain first-hand experience through organized city walks. By going on tours and strolls in Budapest we will learn about the history, culture, the multi-ethnic and ideological complexity of this city, as they are articulated, shaped and preserved in the contemporary urban space.

HISTORY

HIS 352 Film and History (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course is designed as a general survey of the history of Central Europe in the 20th century to enable students to understand current events and their historical background. The focus will be primarily on Central Europe and special attention will be paid to events and trends in Hungarian history in the 20th century, from the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy to the fall of the Soviet bloc. Special attention will be paid to visual representation and to understanding historical events, trends and personalities through film analysis.

HIS 368 Communism in East-Central Europe After World War II (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course is designed to examine the rise and fall of Soviet domination in the countries of East-Central Europe after 1945. The primary focus will be on Hungary and we will investigate the Sovietization of the country, the Stalinist political and social system, the phase of state socialism, everyday life during communism and the period of the transition to democracy. We will also analyze the communist dictatorships and the 1989-1990 revolutions in other countries of the region, such as East-Germany, Czechoslovakia, Poland, Romania, and Yugoslavia. During the semester the students will have an opportunity to watch a documentary film and a feature film connected with the course’s topic, and if time allows, we will visit the House of Terror Museum.

HIS 445 History of Modern Europe (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course aims to provide an overview of the history of twentieth-century Europe. A focus will be laid on Central Europe, in particular, Hungary, and on the way how major West European states (France, Great Britain, Germany) and the superpowers (the USA, former the Soviet Union) influenced and shaped political and economic developments in Central and East Central Europe. We will cover two distinct time spans. The first will cover the period 1890 to 1945. Topics will be the Wilsonian concept of self-determination creating nation-states after the Great War (and replacing multinational ones like the Habsburg Empire) and the end of democratic rule coinciding with revisionism, the rise of authoritarian rule and political extremism. The second time span will cover the period 1945 to present. It starts with the decisive role of the United States and the Soviet Union in establishing a distinct political and economic order in post-war and Cold War Europe. It introduces major political forces in Western Europe and questions the legitimacy of one-party rule in East Central Europe. It deals with the economic policies and integration of Western Europe pre-1989, the end of communist rule in Eastern Europe, and the political integration efforts of a continent that is no more divided within the framework of the European Union.

LAW

LAW 465 International Business Law (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The course is aiming at teaching the international legal frameworks of international business. It starts with an introduction to international business, international law, and the world’s legal systems. It deals with the methods how to resolve international commercial disputes. Sales contracts and excuses for non-performance, the documentary sale and Terms of Trade, bank collections, trade finance and Letter of Credit are discussed in detail. The influence of international organizations as the World Trade Organization, laws governing access to foreign markets are followed by a more detailed review of the characteristic, function, and structure of the European Union and the regulation of competition and subsidy in the common market. Finally, licensing agreements and the protection of intellectual property rights and issues of foreign direct investment are dealt with. Prerequisite: international economics.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POL 301– International Debate (Model United Nations) (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The class will act as committees of the United Nations, with the main aim of discussing, researching, and voting upon strict matters of UN policy and activities. Students will represent various countries during debates and will be tasked with upholding “their” nation’s interest during meetings.

POL 377 International Relations 1945 to Present (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course gives a broad overview of international relations since 1945. It traces the major political, economic, and ideological patterns that have evolved in the global arena from the end of World War II to the present day. The course will consist of five parts: the West and the Cold War; the Soviet orbit; the end of colonialism and Third World nationalisms; global power: from a bipolar to a multipolar order; and the global South and emerging powers. The course will start with the date 1945 and the emergence of the two superpowers, how the Cold War was institutionalized in the forms of confrontation and coexistence. The course will continue with the consolidation of one party rule in the Soviet Union and East Central Europe, and the outreach of the socialist ideology to the developing world (cases are Poland, Hungary, as well as Egypt and India). Decolonization in Asia and Africa that came in violent and non-violent forms will form the third part of the course. (cases Indochina, Algeria, sub-Saharan Africa). In this part, the class will also cover the Arab-Israeli conflict. The fourth part covers the collapse of communism and the partly violent transition to multiparty rule in East Central Europe (cases Poland, Hungary, Yugoslavia). The course will finish of with the rise of new economic powers and a shift towards a multipolar order. Cases are the role of today’s USA, the rise of China, and the challenges of the global South.

POL 386 – European Union Politics (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course gives a broad overview of European integration since 1945. We will cover the history and theories of integration, major institutions, policy areas, and issues of debate. The historic part will place European integration into the global context of superpower domination and Europe searching for a new role since 1990. The part covering theories of integration confronts us with concepts and visions for Europe. They span from a sober and old-fashioned concept of a “Europe of fatherlands” (Charles de Gaulle) to a full-fledged federal vision of a “United States of Europe” (Jean Monnet). The European institutional setting reflects the various approaches towards Europe. Indeed, the EU is governed by a complex set of institutions that reflect the combination of the nation-state level and the supranational European level. We then move towards ‘cases.’ In the European context, this means that we analyze those policy areas that have dominated European politics: agriculture, economic and financial integration, foreign policy, and Justice and Home affairs. We will finish with debates on important ongoing issues like the democratic deficit, differentiated integration, and further enlargements.

2VL60NVGSCG Global Strategy and Competitiveness (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The goal of this course is to provide a solid basis on international and global strategy formulation concepts and tools, and its relatedness to competitiveness in a European and global context. Most relevant concepts and topics will be discussed through case studies. Some of these include: reasons for foreign market entry, selection of host country, multinational and global industries, configurations of multinational enterprises, notion of competitiveness for multinational enterprises and host countries. Prerequisites: standard graduate course on strategy.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 311 Personality Types and Team Dynamics (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

No matter where you work in a company, no matter what you do, you are a part of a team. Today’s business leaders must gain insight into individual differences and team dynamics in order to maximize talents, reframe potential sources of misunderstanding, and facilitate collaboration. What energizes you? How do you acquire information? How do you make decisions? How do you interact with your environment? The answers to these questions will have significant implications for cultivating effective team culture, communication and selling strategies, decision-making, problem-solving and conflict resolution, leadership, and approaches for organizational change in the business environment. The theory of human typology, based on Carl Jung’s research, has given a scientific and effective understanding of human preferences and behavior. One of the most researched and used personality or “human style” assessments in the world is the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) based on Jung’s theory. This course will cover these and other theories of personality.

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 457 Global Social Change and Global Inequalities (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The course analyses key social processes (economic growth, economic inequalities, population and family change, migration, economic integration). It relates them to key social and institutional change for the last 60 years. It reflects on key theories and general interpretations of these changes from the perspective of current globalization. It provides an introduction to the interrelated topics of the development of modernity, capitalism, state socialism, global inequality, poverty, and other emerging global social problems especially in a comparative context. Students will learn about and will use global databanks. This course is a “must” for everybody who, as future international relations expert, sociologist, historian, economist, businessman, political, or administrative person would like to develop a broad interpretative perspective on processes of social change and social structures in our global society.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COURSES

ACCOUNTING

ACC 191 Elements of Accounting (3) – Conducted in English NOTE: PLACES ARE LIMITED [Syllabus]

During the course, basic accounting issues will be studied. This includes foundations, techniques (double-entry) and basic items of the financial statements such as: inventories, property, plant and equipment, receivables – payables, corrections, revenue recognition, etc. Some basic but more complex accounting issues will also be included (provisions, events after the balance sheet date, etc.) Although the course is not designed to explain a specific set of accounting regulation, the specific Hungarian rules will be discussed in brief.

ACC 314 Managerial Accounting (3) – Conducted in English NOTE: PLACES ARE LIMITED [Syllabus]

This course is designed to develop knowledge and understanding of principles and concepts relating to managerial accounting and explain how to use the available techniques. During the course basic cost and managerial accounting issues will be studied. This includes costing methods, short term decision making, pricing methods and budgeting. All problems will be studied in using the case-based learning. After completing this course you will…

  • understand the underlying concepts and principles of managerial and cost accounting and be able to utilize them;
  • be able to use the costing methods as a tool;
  • be able to prepare basic reports for the managers;
  • be able to support decision making.Prerequisite: Elements of Accounting or equivalent.

BUSINESS

BUS 276 Business Economics (3) – Conducted in English NOTE: PLACES ARE LIMITED [Syllabus]

Although firms differ in their size, corporate structure, strategic thinking, managerial behavior, etc., those trying to prosper in a market environment show quite a lot of similarities. Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to identify trends affecting business, understand world economic systems and how they interact with and affect business, learn the different forms of business, understand what is needed to start a small business or to own a franchise and the importance of entrepreneurship in business. The role of ethics, cultural sensitivity, and social responsibility in business will be emphasized. Students will receive an introduction into marketing in the areas of marketing research, product development and pricing, distribution, and promotion, and learn the fundamentals of management including leadership styles and skills, planning, organizing, controlling, directing, evaluating, and motivating. Human resources management and the effect of current technology on management will also be presented.

BUS 435 Business Enterprise – Start-Up to SME (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course covers the characteristics students would need to develop to be successful in business and how new or existing businesses generate their product or service ideas and test them through market research. Students should also consider the competition in the market; the economic climate; how the business might be financed and how much revenue the idea might generate.

BUS 453 International Business Case Studies (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

Increasingly, enterprises of all types are required to compete in multiple foreign markets. Understanding the challenges associated with global business activity, and developing skills in these areas, have become essential requirements for success. The International Business course is designed to provide students with the skills, knowledge, and sensitivity required to work within a global environment.

The course will involve several different teaching styles. Involvement will be both in an individual format and in teams of up to five people. The class will include formal lectures, case and class presentations, guest speakers and videos. Although a formal schedule is included, students should be aware, as in international business, things can change with minimal notice.

Each of the assignments has its own requirements that must be adhered to and are included in the description of those assignments. Much of the ultimate learning and enjoyment from this course will depend on the initiative demonstrated by individual students during class discussions.

The course addresses issues in the strategy, organization marketing, and management of companies operating in the global market. In addition, the course will integrate the sciences of geography and history along with individual country flags and on-going current events. It is assumed students, through the completion of the prerequisite and other relevant courses in marketing, are familiar with the key concepts in international business and marketing research and planning.

Case studies used in this course will help you develop your analytical and decision-making skills and also highlight the reality of environmental uncertainties influencing decision making in the global context. Cases also seek to develop your capacity to identify issues, to reason carefully through various options and improve your ability to manage the organizational process by which decisions get formed and executed. In addition to case analyses, we will also read and discuss additional articles on strategic issues relevant to operating in a global context. Thus, students will develop both, historical and current, and theoretical and practical, perspectives on operating in a global context.

BUSV 489 Electronic Commerce (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The basics of electronic commerce (EC) are described by focusing on various business relationships, and on related marketing, managerial and strategic issues. The most important EC applications, such as buying and selling goods, services and information and the most challenging approaches to doing business electronically (finance, marketing, retailing, services, inter- and intra-firm cooperation) are discussed. Students will also touch upon what EC is, its major opportunities, limitations, issues and risk. Prerequisites: basic technological and managerial knowledge.

BUS 489 Business Communication (3) – Conducted in English NOTE: PLACES ARE LIMITED [Syllabus]

This course will define the key interpersonal skills – all of which are directly related to communication.  We will cover the following issues in an interactive way: Self-concept; The process of communication; Communication competence; Elements of human perception; Learning and memory; Role of emotion in communication;  Improving listening skills; Self-disclosure; Communication methods (written oral, non-verbal); Types of nonverbal communication; Supportive and defensive communication climates; Intercultural and gender differences in communication; Managing interpersonal conflicts; Role of communication in problem solving, creativity, negotiating and managing conflict; Team work; Gathering and analyzing information; Public speaking, influencing, persuasion.

BUS 498 Business Ethics (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

Business is a term representing the activity of commercial production and exchange between the various persons in our modern commercial society. That activity and exchange necessarily take place among and between persons, and therefore have an ethical dimension.

This course, therefore aims to:

  1. Familiarize students with basic philosophical concepts and principles of ethics
  2. Develop the skill of using these concepts and principles to understand and analyze the ethical dimensions of everyday business practices
  3. Sensitize the students to the broad range of moral issues that can arise in modern business
  4. Help students become more aware of their own moral beliefs as well as the beliefs of others, and to make them more articulate and thoughtful in the expression and discussion of moral issues 
BUS 499 Corporate Social Responsibility and Social Entrepreneurship (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

Via dozens of corporate examples, by applying a great variety of exercises, through the diverse lenses of numerous stakeholders let’s discuss how socially and ecologically responsible businesses do/could work. The aim of this course is to provide a meaty and creative environment for teasing ideas on the controversies and complexity of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), Social Entrepreneurship plus other trendy and sensual buzzwords of this field.

Students learn about the diverse background of CSR (corporate philanthropy, business ethics, strategic management, etc.), the various existing – and often competing – approaches to this management concept by looking at best and worst business examples. By listening to guest speakers and seeing the results of most recent research we understand the trends and nature of the “industry” around CSR.  Students practice the preparation and evaluation of CSR actions and tools.  The course also provides and opportunity to meet real life professionals of CSR.

BUS 500 Global Anti-Corruption Business and Governance Strategies (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course will begin with an overview of corruption, its various forms, and types, as it applies to the business world globally and regionally. It will move on to define the problems associated with tackling these types and the continuing need for governmental participation and development on a global scale in order to address and empower against corruption and corrupt practices. The course will consider what corrupt practices are common globally, as well as distinct problems and issues associated with the EU’s strategy and contribution, in addition to the roles of the international community in terms of organizations such as multilateral agencies and donors. Political efforts by way of improving public administration transparency and accountability will be considered and the course will conclude with consideration of the obstacles to reform and the anticipated future strategies to maximize potential impact in governance and business practices.

BUS 627 – Business Valuation (3) – Conducted in English* [Syllabus]

Knowing what an asset is worth and what determines that value is a pre-requisite for intelligent decision making – in choosing investments for a portfolio, in deciding on the appropriate price to pay or receive in a takeover and in making investment, financing and dividend choices when running a business.  The premise of this course is that we can make reasonable estimates of value for most assets, and that the same fundamental principles determine the values of all types of assets, real as well as financial.

This course harnesses the knowledge that students previously gained in the field of accounting and corporate finance by presenting the practical application of these principles and concepts in business performance analysis and valuation.  Students will gain an insight into the various valuation techniques used by both business consultants and investment bankers as well as understand how the various elements in these models are derived, and equally, how our inherent bias and preconceptions do cloud the valuation process.  This course also draws upon illustrations faced by a range of real-world companies across a broad spectrum of industries under different circumstances (start up firms, private firms, inflation, non-perfect capital markets, inadequate financial data, cross border valuations) so that students can grasp the full complexities that underlie each valuation process.

*This course is available to finance majors only.

BUS 780 Strategic Management (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

Weighing the ins and outs of crafting, implementing, and executing company strategies forces a total enterprise perspective, demands that many internal and external situational considerations be dealt with at once, and calls for judgments about how all the relevant factors add up. This trait is what makes strategic management an integrative course.The centre of attention is the total enterprise–-the industry and competitive environment in which it operates, its long-term direction and strategy, its resources and competitive capabilities, and its prospects for success.

Throughout the course, the spotlight will be trained on the foremost issue in running a business enterprise: “What must managers do, and do well, to make the company a winner in the game of business?” The answer that emerges, and which becomes the theme of the course, is that good strategy-making and good strategy-execution are the key ingredients of company success and the most reliable signs of good management. The mission of the course is to explore why good strategic management leads to good business performance, to present the basic concepts and tools of strategic analysis, and to drill you in the methods of crafting a well-conceived strategy and executing it competently. Videos and case studies in order to develop students’ capacity to think strategically about a company, its present business position, its long-term direction, its resources and competitive capabilities, the calibre of its present strategy, and its opportunities for gaining sustainable competitive advantage.

ECONOMICS

ECO 238 International Economics (3) – Conducted in English NOTE: PLACES ARE LIMITED [Syllabus]

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the conceptual, theoretical and methodological fundamentals of international economics. Typical subjects covered are those of international trade and finance, foreign direct investment, cross border lending, factor markets, decisions on new products based on global markets. Emphasis will be put on trade. Students should be able to understand global economic developments and to evaluate proposals for changing economic policies. The course combines rigorous economic analysis with attention to issues of economic policy alive and important today. Prerequisites: ECO 131 and ECO 136 or equivalents.

ECO 305 Globalization (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The activity and exchange between the economy and society necessarily take place among and between people and therefore have an ethical dimension. But the complexity of politics, economy and social interaction in the global environment, as well as the rapid changes in different settings and practices caused by global changes (such as technological and cultural changes) often make it very difficult for us to perceive ethical issues in cultural globalization and to know how to deal with them.

ECO 395 Economics and the European Union (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The aims of this course are as follows:

  1. To enable students to gain a comprehensive insight into the workings of the European Union and the place of member nations within it.
  2. To equip students with the required knowledge, skills and abilities to permit them to proceed, if desired, to further specialist studies.

The objectives of this course are as follows:

  1. To develop awareness and understanding of the European Union by providing students, through lectures, seminars and case studies, with a comprehensive insight into the workings of the European Union and the place of member nations within it.
  2. To enable students to demonstrate an understanding of developments, past, present and future, impacting upon the economy of the European Union by exploring:
    • its background – origins, evolution, structure; key areas of its economy, and; the main planks of economic policy.
    • ECO 411 The Economics and the Ethics of Globalization (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

      “Learning the practices and consequences of managing ethically in the changing cultural, economic, political, technological, in a global environment.” This course examines the norms or principles that establish and justify societies and determine the rights and responsibilities of a society in a globalized world. Furthermore, we will analyze, what is the responsibility of individuals in relation to each other and to society as a whole, and of a society in relation to other societies. The course will consider the application of these principles to such issues as justice, ethics, political, and social institutions, in a world community. The class is, first and foremost, a course about ethics and economics in a globalized world. It is also a class designed with a heavy emphasis on reading, writing, and class participation.

ECO 415 Transition and Post-Transition Challenges in Hungary (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The quick disintegration of the planned economy led to a regime change in Central Eastern Europe after the fall of the Berlin wall in 1989, opening the road for the whole region to integrate into Western economic, political and security systems. This transition has, however, proved to be uneven, painful and unpopular. The course aims at analyzing the particular Hungarian regime change events and the transition process that evolved once the country left behind the former political system. Hungary was seen as a leading reformer in the early 1990s, and as a natural candidate to join the European integration among the very firsts, yet at present Hungary – already an EU member state – struggles with the economic slowdown, persistent inflation, problems in public finance, and a certain `adjustment fatigue`.

TOUWO_VTSZO – Tourism and World Economy (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The goal of this course is to provide comprehensive theoretical and practical knowledge on the tourism and the travel business, including hospitality, and to give the students extensive information on various components, systems and impacts of tourism. The course is designed to provide for participants to respond to a dynamic and fast changing industry. This module allows participants to appreciate the role of tourism in a global context and to appreciate the changing role of Europe in such contexts.

IEC 483 Tourism Management and Marketing (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

There will be an analysis of the policy and stakeholder frameworks for tourism that govern its management on an international, regional and local scale, as well as the business and industry decisions that affect its development. The course will focus on some of the impacts of tourism, especially in countries which are economically dependent on tourism. This will include an overview of the tools and techniques that are used to manage and market tourism in a range of environments, the relationship between tourists and local residents, and the role of tourist behavior and education. There will be a focus on destination management, sustainable and ethical tourism, as well as some of the forms of new technology (e.g. e-tourism) which facilitate the management and marketing of tourism.

ECO 536 Market and Democracy (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The aim of the course is to understand the logic and the different forms of industrial societies in a theoretical framework built on the conceptualization of the inter-relationship of economic and political structures. The course starts with the analysis of the concepts of democracy, property rights and market coordination. Then it deals with the different forms of capitalist industrialization, with the ties between the forms of industrialization and the forms of the modern state. We examine the emergence of the mixed economy and the welfare state that maintains the links between mass democracy and market economy. Modern capitalism assumes different forms, we analyze the alternative models of the capitalist system. Then we turn to the description of the socialist economy and polity. The socialist system is explained as an alternative form of industrialization under the circumstances of economic backwardness. This analysis rests on the concepts of Kornai’s shortage theory of socialism. The post-socialist transition in East-Central Europe was initiated by political changes. The course looks at the theoretical framework built up for the analysis of the democratization process and at the application of the concepts to the Hungarian case. The post-socialist transition has had to face the dilemma of simultaneity: the parallel processes of democratization, marketization and the remodeling of the welfare state. We deal with some of these problems: look at the political dynamics of economic reforms, the politics of privatization, the contradictions of the post socialist welfare state, the role of interest groups in the transition. We ask the question whether the post socialist states are going to assume the characteristics of any existing models of capitalism, that is we address the problems of comparison between capitalist and post-socialist economies and polities.

FINANCE

FIN 351 Corporate Finance I (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The aim of the course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the principles and techniques of corporate finance and applying them to the main decisions faced by the financial manager. The course is divided into 3 main sections, beginning with the concept of valuation where topics covering time value of money and the valuation of income streams, share and bond valuations will be discussed. The course will thereafter extend these principles in the second section to provide an in-depth discussion and critical analysis of the various techniques used in investment appraisal decisions: Net Present Value, Internal Rate of Return, Payback Period. These techniques will be applied to more complex investment proposals, including choices between alternative projects, investment timing decisions and decisions on whether to invest. The final section explores the relationship between risk and return, diversifiable and non-diversifiable risks, and beta through the use of the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM) to determine the Weighted Average Cost of Capital that financial managers use as a hurdle rate for project evaluation in order to achieve the ultimate aim of maximizing the value of the firm. Prerequisite: FIN 156 (Basic Finance) or basic knowledge of microeconomics, financial accounting, or statistics.

A financial calculator may be required for this course.
FIN 651 Corporate Financing Policy (3) – Conducted in English* [Syllabus]

This course will present a general and economic framework for analyzing the effects of financing decisions on corporate value. It combines elements of finance theory with contextual application of corporate financing in the European financial market. Students will gain an insight into the spectrum of capital acquisition instruments available in well-functioning capital markets and develop an appreciation of the theory of capital structure and its implications for both perfect and imperfect markets. The course will also discuss the relationship between financing and investment decisions and look into the latest research developments and issues pertaining to financing decisions, corporate control and the value of the firm. Prerequisite: FIN 551 Investment Analysis or its equivalent. Students are also expected to possess a good knowledge of investment theory (notion of present value, discounting methods, valuation of securities, Capital Asset Pricing Model, capital budgeting). A financial calculator may be required for this course.

*This course is available to finance majors only.

FIN 754 Multinational Financial Management (3) – Conducted in English* [Syllabus]

This course provides an introduction to international financial markets and to the management of the special risks arising from international transactions. Topics include the environment of international financial management, foreign exchange and derivatives markets, foreign exchange risk management and foreign investment analysis. The basic thrust of this course is to provide a conceptual framework within which the essential financial decisions of the multinational firm can be analyzed. The approach is to treat international financial management as a natural and logical extension of the principles learned in the foundations course in financial management. Analytical techniques developed help to translate the often-vague rules of thumb used by international financial executives into specific decision criteria. Examples will show students the value of examining decision problems with the aid of a solid theoretical foundation.

*This course is available to finance majors only.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

COM 453 Effective E-Business Management (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of e­-business. Types, business models and operations of e­-business applications will be demonstrated.

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Appreciate the importance of e-­business in the modern economy
  • Describe the history and principles behind e­-commerce infrastructure
  • Explain the role of technology and information systems in an e-­business enterprise.
  • Define the main ideas behind e-­commerce and discuss the importance of website design and maintenance
  • Consider the roles of various stakeholders in the e­-commerce process
  • Analyze business processes with the intent to gain competitive advantage
  • Apply principles and key methods used in defining customer requirements
  • Construct business models to analyze business plans
  • Explain sound user interface design guidelines and system usability
  • Utilize techniques and tools of payment systems
  • Explain the role of different types of information system vulnerabilities, security and data protection measures
  • Understand the structure and functionality of essential on­line marketing technologies.
COM 485 Web Development (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course gives a comprehensive view of the client-side web development including the optimization of the webpages for the different browsers, resolutions and search engines. The students will learn HTML coding, webpage layouts and technique of using CSS. The course gives an introduction to use the main web developer tools, including Adobe Dreamweaver CS5, FirstPage 2006 and Adobe Photoshop CS4.

COM 512 Managing Enterprise Resource Planning with SAP R/3 (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The course aims at giving general overview of business information systems with special respect to enterprise resource planning software and the field of their applications. A basic overview is given of the structure of the leading ERP software SAP, regarding it functionality and features. The core modules of SAP – accounting and controlling – are detailed further in depth. As a part of the course students learn how to perform most basic and some advanced accounting and controlling transaction in the system. Special emphasis is given to understand and use the reporting possibilities that SAP uniquely offers, how to find relevant information in the system and analyze them with the drill-down function of SAP. In the end the course offers examples of the advantages of integration, as well advanced techniques in integrated ERP systems such as workflow. All functions will be presented via a sample company called IDES which is specially designed by SAP Germany AG for educational purposes. The main goal is not teaching the usage of the software, but demonstrating real life scenarios and their solution with integrated information and resource planning system. Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of accounting and controlling terms.

COM 535 Business Intelligence (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course provides a comprehensive overview about the field of business intelligence. Topics such as data warehousing, business analytics, business performance management systems, data, text and web mining will be covered. The course has three major objectives: a) to highlight the theoretical background of business intelligence; b) to demonstrate students the tools necessary for understanding the features of business intelligence; c) to offer practical experiences about the application of different business intelligence systems.

MANAGEMENT

 

MAN 479 Environmental Management (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The course is planned for students who, while not specialists in environmental issues, would like to receive insight into causes of environmental problems and the possible corrective actions that can be taken at company level.

To start, topics of sustainability, environmental policy and instruments of environmental economics will be explained. We indicate how environmental policy is needed to correct market distortions caused by externalities, and corporate profitability and long term survival is also influenced by this policy.

Environmental strategies can support business strategy and competitiveness provided they are properly chosen. We analyze the environmental strategy options of firms and selection of environmental tools that exist in the corporate toolbox, together with the circumstances that influence the correct choice among strategies and tools. The “greenest” is not necessarily the best for all kinds of companies.

Students will:

  • Gain a broad understanding of environmental issues that affect businesses
  • Understand concepts such as Sustainable Development and it’s relation to the corporate sector
  • Be able to identify and analyses the drivers behind the choice of corporate environmental strategy
  • Be able to define the application, benefits and drawbacks of the most commonly-used corporate environmental tools
  • Be better positioned to critically analyze corporate behavior in relation to the environment
MAN 481 Organizational Behavior (3) – Conducted in English NOTE: PLACES ARE LIMITED [Syllabus]

This purpose of this course is to provide the student with theories and concepts to enable understanding of the behavior of individuals, groups and organizations in today’s global business environment. The interactions between elements of the organization as well as personality, leadership, motivation, job satisfaction, individual performance to achieve organizational effectiveness will be explored. Prerequisites: Some academic knowledge of human resources and behavior, strategic management or general and international business. Knowledge of sociology and social psychology facilitate the learning outcome.

MAN 485 Human Resource Management (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

Effective Human Resources Management is necessary to gain true competitive advantage in the marketplace. Today companies face several challenges such as: sustainability, technology, and globalization. This Course will attempt to bring these challenges to life by highlighting real-world examples pertaining to these issues and relating them to the theoretical concepts.

Students will be provided with the technical background needed to be a knowledgeable consumer of human resource products and services, to manage HR effectively, or to be a successful HR professional. Above all, the course will emphasize how managers can more effectively acquire, develop, compensate, and manage the internal and external environment that relates to the management of human resources. Much attention will be given to the strategic use of HR Management and its evolvement across borders and cultures. Prerequisite: knowledge of Organizational Behaviour and Management.

MAN 488 – Introduction to International Business (3) – Conducted in English NOTE: PLACES ARE LIMITED [Syllabus]

This course presents an introduction into the international world of business, and the impact and consequences of globalization and competition on the firm.  The student will gain an understanding on the theories, foundations and institutions governing the recent and current expansion of international trade and investments, and develop insights into the every changing business environment.   The student will study how firms adapt to their environment, and simultaneously deal with increased competition, new markets and opportunities, technology and the growth and influx of specialized services, and changing customer tastes. Prerequisites: Basic courses in Economics and Marketing.

MAN 669 Management Skills (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

Effective skills in interpersonal communication are essential for successful working career.The ability to be in command of one’s own life, to relate well to other people and to be able to lead others in positive direction is a valuable commodity in the changing time in which we live.The pace of living is fast and the need for adapting to change is more important than ever before. The measure of one’s success depends largely on their dealings with other people and their ability to adapt to changing environment. This course is designed to provide introduction to interpersonal skills theories and help students to identify ways of applying these to their own work life.

The course is intended to introduce theories and practices of different areas and functions that are necessary to become a successful manager. The subject covers important issues of management, such as self-awareness, team-building, stress management, crisis management, conflict handling, negotiation strategies and tactics, communication and persuasion skills and managerial decision making, including creative techniques. The major aim is not only to teach the relevant theoretical background of the above issues, but to practice how they can be applied in organizations, in real life situations. Hence the frame of reference is the organization with its complexities and varieties of individuals and subsystems.

MAN 672 Global Business Strategy (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The purpose of Global Business Strategy course is for the students to change the perspective from a traditional home-base view to an international, even global frame- work. Here we will deal with the strategy of developing your business on an international scale either with just a sales and marketing strategy for products and services on the on hand or a total transformation of a company into a global player with a different functional headquarters in different continents. both examples are the extreme end of a spectrum and the usual solution is in between. We will not focus only on the international sales and marketing as our business only. Contrary we will have an extensive look into transforming people, production, and processes into an internationalized company operating in different continents across very different market cultures. Some parts of the course will relate to important concepts and information, while others involve skills-building. Therefore intercultural communication, change management, decision making and ethical implications will become part of the course. The center of attention is the total enterprise–-the industry and competitive environment in which it operates, its long-term direction and strategy, its resources and competitive capabilities, and its prospects for success. We will introduce the St.Gall management model of holistic and cross-functional integrating management.

MAN 686 Comparative, Cross-Cultural Management (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course is designed to deepen knowledge and skills in cross-cultural and intercultural management and communication. The focus of the course is on the relationship between cultural context and interpersonal behavior and actions. Topics include: views of culture; traditional and alternative approaches to research on culture; coping with challenges in a multi-cultural environment; working internationally. Upon completion of this course, students will have developed an understanding of the cross-cultural and international aspects of management; improved awareness of their own and others’ culture; strengthened their intercultural communication skills and learned how to apply specific management tasks, like negotiation in a foreign setting; and developed critical thinking by consciously interpreting and employing findings of traditional and alternative cross-cultural and international studies. Prerequisite: graduate level students or seniors. Successful completion of organizational behavior or management, or similar coursework.

MAN 771 Change Management (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The past two decades have seen companies dealing with an ever changing business environment.  New technologies, products, competitors, markets and services are only some of the factors requiring the firms to re-examine their traditional mode of operations, and in many cases the foundations of its existence.  Within the company, the firm is also facing internal pressures to change in the areas of strategy, human resources relationships, innovation and creativity. This course dwells upon the change issues facing firms, and the difficulties of devising and implementing successful solutions.   During the course, the student will understand the various theories and dimensions of management and employee involvement in the change process, analyze situations and develop the skills and utilize the tools to implement change effectively within a clear framework of approaches.

The course is interactive, requiring students to participate in individual and groups in analyzing real world cases, and using the tools and techniques learnt to develop practical and workable solutions. Prerequisite: basic knowledge of management and strategy. A course in HRM is also advised.

2VE81NVMMEG Managing the Multinational Enterprise (3) [Syllabus]

Increasingly, firms are required to compete in multiple foreign markets at both the product and supply-chain levels. Understanding the challenges associated with the global business activity, and developing skills in these areas, have become essential requirements. The Managing of Multinational Enterprise course is designed to provide students with the skills, knowledge, and sensitivity required to work within a global environment. The course addresses issues in the strategy, organization and management of companies operating in the global market.

Case studies used in this course will help students develop their analytical and decision-making skills and also highlight the reality of environmental uncertainties influencing decision making in the global context. Cases also seek to develop students’ capacity to identify issues, to reason carefully through various options and improve their ability to manage the organizational process by which decisions get formed and executed. In addition to case analyses students will also read and discuss additional articles on strategic issues relevant to operating in a global context. Thus, students will develop both, historical and current, and theoretical and practical, perspectives on operating in a global context.

MARKETING

MAR 370 Marketing (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the main principles of marketing in the 21st century. The focus will be on analyzing and integrating elements of the marketing program and developing marketing decisions, the main objective being the development of profitable long-term customer relationships.

MAR 523 Services Marketing (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The service sector of the world economy is huge and still growing. Many services have always been present to some degree, but the complexity and diversity of services have increased dramatically over the past 50 years. In economic terms, the service sector now accounts for about 58% of the gross national product of the world, while in 1980 it was only 20 %. All of the developed economies now have large service sectors and many service firms operate internationally.

This course will highlight the fundamental differences between goods and services focusing on the managerial implications. An overview will be provided on service operations including service related issues on innovation, communication, pricing, physical environment and managing people. A strong emphasis is placed on e-business applications.

MAR 524 Consumer Behavior (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course will give students the knowledge and skills needed to understand and interpret the behavior of consumers in various markets. It will cover every important aspect of consumer behavior including consumer decision processes, psychological processes and environmental influences. It will rely on the most relevant results of consumer research and will introduce students to basic consumer research techniques. Prerequisite: Marketing Principles.

MAR 526 Consumer Behavior: Millenials and Generation Z (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

According to Goldman Sachs, millennials were born between the years 1980 and 2000. In the U.S, millenials are now the biggest generation in its history, even bigger than the Baby Boomers. Generation Z (Gen Z) is defined as those born between 2000 onwards. It is estimated that the size of the Gen Z population in India is an incredible 356 million people. In the U.S. by 2020, Gen Z will account for almost 40% of consumers and will soon overtake millennials as the largest generation. While millenials and Gen Z share some similarities, they are also noticeable differences. Since technology is now evolving more rapidly than ever, both millenials and Gen Z are not only being affected by technology, their behavior is actually shaping its future. This course will provide a deep dive into the consumer behavior of both millenials and Gen Z and explore how effectively brands utilize messaging and emerging technologies to grab the attention of those who have short attention spans.

MAR 557 Brand Management (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The main objective of the course is to get students familiar with the concepts of branding as part of the overall marketing strategy, to understand the basic elements of brand creation, its underlying conceptual structure and theoretical base, to improve communication skills and team spirit by analyzing, writing and presenting group work, solving cases. More and more firms have come to the realization that one of the most valuable assets they have is the brand name associated with their products or services. Despite this realization, the task of assessing the value of something of intangible (like brand equity) and devising ways of managing it successfully is difficult. Prerequisite: Marketing Principles.

MAR 649 Online and Digital Marketing (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

Digital marketing is an exciting area of marketing practice. This course will cover the what, why, where, to whom and how of major current online and digital marketing approaches. The course will cover the different areas of marketing, and so include the marketing mix elements from consumer behavior, digital products, technology aspects, innovation acceptance, online pricing, online distribution, online and digital communication.

Students will focus on selected specific areas of online presence, content creation and communication interactions as search engine marketing, social media channels and participation in audience interactions. In addition to those specific topics, three key messages are woven throughout the course. First, establish habits for keeping up to date on emerging digital technologies relevant to business and to marketing. Second, rise to the challenge of developing strategy to guide tactics. Third, showing the new content creator role of today’s marketers.

 

432_4320VTE International Marketing (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course addresses global issues and describes concepts relevant to all international marketers. An environmental/cultural approach to international marketing will be in the focus of the course. The course is designed to provide students with an understanding of different cultures and the role of cultural differences in international marketing practices. It helps students appreciate the issues, problems, and challenges inherent in cultural differences and their effects on international marketing strategies.

The objective of the course is to make students understand how the elements of the macro-environment influence the companies’ marketing activities abroad. One of the main objectives is to understand the key characteristics of various country markets and how to develop marketing plans in diverse environments. Throughout the course, a variety of country markets in various regions of the world will be discussed and a variety of different types of products and services will be addressed.

CULCO_VTMAR Cross-Cultural Communication and Marketing (3) [Syllabus]

In the first part of the semester (until the midterm) the focus of the course will be on discussing cultures, different theories of culture, country images, stereotypes and on analyzing specific countries from different points of view. Participants coming from various countries will introduce their own culture throughout the semester.

In the second part of the semester – based on the concepts learnt in the first part – students will practice how to use this knowledge in evaluating companies’ international marketing activities and formulating intercultural marketing strategies.

MATHEMATICS/RESEARCH COURSES

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

OPR 212 Decision Techniques (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

Dealing with individual and organizational decision-making issues, this course addresses the practical aspects of decision making. It provides a multidisciplinary approach to the various organizational contexts where managers work. Problem structuring, modeling, decision making and its techniques will be considered, with specific emphasis on their practical aspects. The course will emphasize less the quantitative methods, instead explores the rational, emotional and group dynamic background.

The course will examine how decision theory, originally developed as a theory for individual decision-making, can be applied to group and organizational decision making processes. The implementation difficulties which are part of the decision-making process will be discussed as well. This course is intended for students in the various management disciplines.

OPR 517 Decision Making Skills (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

This course consists of two major subjects: 1) decision theory, and 2) decision support systems. Therefore, the course addresses both the theoretical and practical processes and skills of decision-making from the individual to organizational and social levels. It starts with a short historical introduction, which helps in understanding the relationship of decision theory and decision support, followed by a primarily problem-centered approach to the subject, with a number of examples and different applications. It examines issues in personal decision-making, looking at how we can describe the process involved in forming judgments, planning actions and evaluating their consequences, what happens in social decision-making when people have conflicting objectives, and how risk is managed. Techniques for aiding decision-making are explored and ways in which decision support systems may be embedded in the decision-making processes are investigated.

OPR 518 – Project Management (3) – Conducted in English [Syllabus]

The most characteristic feature of an organization is change. The direction of change is set by the organizational strategy while the means of achieving the strategic objectives are projects and project management. Thus, long term success of an organization requires successful projects. Based on these considerations, the course encompasses scope definition; stakeholder management; time, resources and cost assessment; risk assessment; project organizations; project control; project termination; project implementation strategy; pre-qualification and bid ranking; project management methodologies. The primary aim of the course is to develop knowledge, skill and attitude regarding the above mentioned PM toolkit and dealing with projects.