Excursions | API Study Abroad
Excursions

Highlights

  • Courses in German

Requirements

  • Minimum 2.75 G.P.A.
  • Open to freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Open to high-beginner and above level German speakers
  • Completed API Application
  • University contact information form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • Official transcript
  • Copy of passport
  • Entry requirements: valid passport with supporting documents

Dates & Fees

SUMMER 1 2018
Late Jun, 2018 - Mid-Jul, 2018
$5,280
SUMMER 2 2018
Mid-Jul, 2018 - Mid-Aug, 2018
$5,280
SUMMER 1 & 2 COMBINED 2018
Mid-Jun, 2018 - Mid-Aug, 2018
$9,480

Deadlines

SUMMER 1 2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Mar 15, 2018
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Apr 1, 2018
SUMMER 2 2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Mar 15, 2018
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Apr 1, 2018
SUMMER 1 & 2 COMBINED 2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Mar 15, 2018
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Apr 1, 2018

EXCURSIONS

API students participate in several excursions per session designed to help familiarize them with areas of Germany outside of the host city. The following is a comprehensive listing of all excursions for API Berlin programs. All excursions are subject to change.

Summer 1

BERLIN

Summer students at Humboldt will receive their introduction to the capital city upon arrival, and will also experience the city through course activities and extracurricular events.

Local field-trips comprise an integral component of many of the courses. These often include picnics, concerts, festivals, and/or outings to relevant areas of interest around Berlin. Semester students also receive a pass for use in all museums associated with the Foundation for State Museums in Berlin (Staatliche Museen zu Berlin). Details vary per course and term. Other day trips may include:

HAMBURG

Hamburg is located on the Elbe River in northern Germany and it is the country’s largest port and commercial center with a population of over 1.7 million people. Top points of interest in Hamburg include the old warehouse district and harbor promenade, and its system of canals reminiscent of Amsterdam. The city is also known for its lakes, parks, and verdant suburbs full of gracious houses; elegant shopping arcades; richly endowed museums; and a vibrant cultural life.

Hamburg’s historic label, ‘The gateway to the world’, might be a bold claim, but Germany’s second-largest city and its biggest port has never been shy. Hamburg has engaged in business with the world ever since it joined the Hanseatic League back in the Middle Ages. Its role as a center of international trade in the late 19th and early 20th centuries brought it great wealth (and Unesco World Heritage recognition in 2015), a legacy that continues today: it’s one of Germany’s wealthiest cities.

LEIPZIG

Leipzig is the most populous city in the state of Saxony, Germany, and it is located about 160 kilometers (99 mi) southwest of Berlin. It has become known as one of the most trendy and up-in-coming cities in all of Germany – even rivaling Berlin! The historic central area of Leipzig features a renaissance style ensemble of buildings from the 16th century, including the old city hall in the marketplace. There are also several baroque period trading houses and former residences of rich merchants. The ‘it’ district, Plagwitz, is decked out in industrial chimneys and brick housing combined with rejuvenated, once derelict buildings.

POTSDAM

Potsdam is undoubtedly one of Germany’s most beautiful cities. Nestled in a charming cultural landscape dotted with palaces and historic gardens, which have been on the UNESCO’s World Cultural Heritage list since 1990, turn the capital of the Federal State of Brandenburg into a great travel destination, suiting all sorts of interests and demands.

The Sanssouci palace was the summer residence of Frederick the Great. Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff built it above the terraced vineyard from 1745 to 1747 following the King’s ideas and sketches. The palace is considered the major work of Rococo architecture in Germany. Paintings by Watteau, Panini and Pesne are on exhibit in the picture gallery.

Summer 2

BERLIN

Summer students at Humboldt will receive their introduction to the capital city upon arrival, and will also experience the city through course activities and extracurricular events.

Local field-trips comprise an integral component of many of the courses. These often include picnics, concerts, festivals, and/or outings to relevant areas of interest around Berlin. Semester students also receive a pass for use in all museums associated with the Foundation for State Museums in Berlin (Staatliche Museen zu Berlin). Details vary per course and term. Other trips may include:

DRESDEN

Dresden is the capital city of the state of Saxony. It is situated in a valley on the River Elbe, near the Czech border. The Dresden conurbation is part of the Saxon Triangle metropolitan area with 2.4 million inhabitants.

Dresden has a long history as the capital and royal residence for the Electors and Kings of Saxony, who for centuries furnished the city with cultural and artistic splendor. The city was known as the Jewel Box, because of its baroque and rococo city center.

A controversial Allied aerial bombing towards the end of World War II killed 25,000 civilians and destroyed the entire city center. The impact of the bombing and 40 years of urban development during the East German communist era have considerably changed the face of the city.

Some restoration work has helped to reconstruct parts of the historic inner city, including the Katholische Hofkirche, the Semper Opera and the Dresdner Frauenkirche. Since German reunification in 1990, Dresden has regained importance as one of the cultural, educational, political and economic centers of Germany and Europe.

POTSDAM

Potsdam is undoubtedly one of Germany’s most beautiful cities. Nestled in a charming cultural landscape dotted with palaces and historic gardens, which have been on the UNESCO’s World Cultural Heritage list since 1990, turn the capital of the Federal State of Brandenburg into a great travel destination, suiting all sorts of interests and demands.

The Sanssouci palace was the summer residence of Frederick the Great. Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff built it above the terraced vineyard from 1745 to 1747 following the King’s ideas and sketches. The palace is considered the major work of Rococo architecture in Germany. Paintings by Watteau, Panini and Pesne are on exhibit in the picture gallery.

SPREEWALD

Settled by the Sorbs and Wends in the sixth century AD, the Spreewald region was a farming region with a problem. The area’s wetlands made agriculture difficult, so the farmers resolved the issue by digging channels (Fließen) to the Spree for irrigation and drainage.

Lübbenau is a town of 17,897 in the Oberspreewald-Lausitz district of Brandenburg, about 82 km (51 mi) southeast of Berlin. It was first mentioned in a sales document in 1315 but is believed to be much older due to excavations below the castle that show settlement from the 8th or 9th century. From 1364 to 1635, Lübbenau was part of the Kingdom of Bohemia, and then until 1815 part of the Electorate of Saxony. From 1815 to 1918, Lübbenau was governed by the Kingdom of Prussia.

Lübbenau offers a variety of sights: the marina with its traditional boats, or a castle which is set in a nicely arranged park, including an orangerie with a cafe and a hotel. There are cycling routes to nearby villages, and boat rides are popular. The city wall’s history dates back to the Middle Ages and the museum next to the city gate offers insights into the architecture as well as the rich history of the region.