Course Offerings | API Study Abroad
Course Offerings

Highlights

  • Classes taught in French
  • Transcript from U.S. accredited institution available (UMass Amherst)
  • Teaching internships available for credit
  • International excursion

Requirements

  • Minimum 2.5 G.P.A.
  • Open to freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors
  • Open to all levels of French speakers
  • Completed API application
  • University contact information form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • One official transcript
  • Entry requirements: valid passport with student visa

 

Dates & Fees

FALL QUARTER 2018
Oct 16, 2018 - Dec 15, 2018
$11,980
FALL SEMESTER 2018
Sep 5, 2018 - Dec 20, 2018
$13,800
ACADEMIC YEAR 2018-2019
Sep 5, 2018 - May 25, 2019
$26,400
SPRING SEMESTER 2019
Jan 30, 2019 - May 25, 2019
$13,800

Deadlines

FALL QUARTER 2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Jun 10, 2018
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Jul 1, 2018
FALL SEMESTER 2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Jun 10, 2018
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Jul 1, 2018
ACADEMIC YEAR 2018-2019
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Jun 10, 2018
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Jul 1, 2018
SPRING SEMESTER 2019
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Oct 15, 2018
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Nov 1, 2018

Course Offerings

If you require syllabi that are not listed below, please contact your API Program Coordinator.

 

REQUIRED COURSES

Depending on the term, students take 9-18 semester credit hours of French Language and Culture. Quarter students take 3 hours of language per day, and semester students take 2 hours of language per day, five days per week. Language courses are available at five different levels. Students will also take a Phonetics class for a portion of the session. Students complete their class schedule after the online placement test (completed prior to the program start) and the class schedule depends on their language level.

The program consists of three main areas of study:
French Language – Conducted in French [A1 Syllabus] [A2 Syllabus] [B1.2 Syllabus] [B1.2 Syllabus] [B2 Syllabus] [C1 Syllabus]

These classes allow students to progress in learning French (grammar, verb conjugation, spelling, vocabulary, approach to literary texts, written and spoken expression). Taught at five different levels, these classes are offered two hours per day, five days a week. Students are placed into the appropriate class based on an initial language placement exam.

Phonetics – Conducted in French

These classes allow students to improve their pronunciation, comprehension and expression skills (with lab work). These classes are offered one hour per day, five days a week (every other week). Although the phonetics course meets separately from the French language course, the grades and credits will appear together on the student’s transcript.

French Civilization Courses – Conducted in French

These cultural “conférences” (weekly civilization lectures) cover the areas of arts, geography, history, language & culture, literature, politics and society and are offered weekly throughout the term. Students choose two or three topics, with each lecture lasting two hours per week. Topics vary by level.

Following are examples of previous French civilization courses offered to Sorbonne semester students. These courses are subject to change:

FALL

Available to students at all levels
  • Civilisation et littérature françaises (French Civilization and Literature) [Syllabus]
  • Médias, communication, et publicité (Media, Communication, and Publicity) [Syllabus]
  • Poésie et chanson [Syllabus]
  • Le château de Versailles [Syllabus]
  • Histoire de l’art français (French Art History) [Syllabus]
  • Histoire et Francophonie [Syllabus]
  • La chanson, “bande originale de nos vies” [Syllabus]
Available to students at the Débutant (A1), Élémentaire (A2), and Intermédiaire (B1.1) levels
Available to students at the Intermédiaire (B1.2), Avancé (B2), and Supérieur (C1) levels
  • Histoire de l’art français (French Art History) [Syllabus]
  • Chefs-d’œuvre du théâtre français [Syllabus]
  • Symbolisme et esthétique« fin de siècle »- quelques figures [Syllabus]
  • Figures artistiques et littéraires en leur siècle, du 19e à nos jours [Syllabus]
  • Autobiography et Autofiction [Syllabus]
Following are examples of previous French civilization courses offered to Sorbonne semester students. These courses are subject to change:

 SPRING

Available to students at all levels
  • La Parole Politique – Histoire et Actualité [Syllabus]
  • Poésie et Chanson [Syllabus]
  • Civilisation française [Syllabus]
  • Symbolisme et esthétique [Syllabus]
  • Vie politique française : histoire et actualité [Syllabus]
  • La chanson, « bande originale de nos vies » [Syllabus]
  • Histoire de l’Art en France [Syllabus]
  • La Loire et ses châteaux, de l’époque romane à l’âge classique. [Syllabus]
Available to students at the Débutant (A1), Élémentaire (A2), and Intermédiaire (B1.1) levels
  • Chefs-d’œuvre du théâtre français [Syllabus]
  • Panorama des habitudes et des traditions françaises [Syllabus]
Available to students at the Intermédiaire (B1.2), Avancé (B2), and Supérieur (C1) levels
OPTIONAL COURSES TAUGHT IN FRENCH – SEMESTER STUDENTS ONLY

These 300 level (Advanced) courses are taught in French and are offered exclusively to API students. The number of semester is indicated in parentheses after the course title. Students typically take this course in place of a CCFS elective. An additional fee may be charged for participation in the API course (whether taken in place of or in addition to a regular elective course). Course subject to minimum enrollment.

History of French Cuisine (3) – Conducted in French – FALL

Who has never dreamt of chocolate mousse, foie gras, or fondue? Why is France so attached to its cuisine and culinary traditions? How did they develop and what role do they play within daily life as well as national identity? How could the French indulge themselves in fastuous and lengthy meals and joyfully continue to speak about food while eating? What does eating mean? This course is designed to understand the role and place of French Cuisine within its society from a historical, ethnological, and sociological point of view, and to put into practice this “savoir vivre français” by cooking some traditional dishes and sharing them together. This is a reading and research class, with a cooking and tasting component.

French Civilization (3) – Conducted in French – SPRING

The post-WWII era was a time of deep transformations in the French way of living, the political structure of the French society, and through cultural and social representations and is strongly represented through the Parisian architecture and the design of the main avenues and boulevards. This course examines French society chronologically from 1945 to today by highlighting the main events of this era and examining the city itself through daily life, buildings, movies, paintings, and theoretical developments.

OPTIONAL COURSES THROUGH THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT – SEMESTER STUDENTS ONLY

These elective courses are offered through the University of Connecticut and taught by local faculty. Offerings vary per semester.

Art History: From the Impressionists to Picasso (3) – Conducted in English – FALL

Course description currently unavailable.

Cultural History: Post-War France (1944045) to Today (3) – Conducted in English – FALL

If Paris has been known as the “capital city of the nineteenth century (regarding its architecture or the design of the main avenues and boulevards, for example), the post-WWII era was a time of deep transformation in the way of life, in the political structure of French society, and in cultural and social representations as well.  Based on a chronological presentation of the main events, focusing on the city of Paris, on daily life, buildings, movies, paintings, and theoretical developments, we will try to delineate the main aspects of this era.

Fashion in France: 18th-21st Century (3) – Conducted in French – FALL

This course is a survey of French fashion history from the late 17th century to the early 21st century.  Throughout the semester you will become familiar with the main lines of fashion history (styles, personalities, designers).  You will also learn about the history of Paris as a fashion industry hub and the origins of the French luxury fashion industry.

Human Rights: Being International (3) – Conducted in English – FALL

This course offers an introduction to international Human Rights Law. Each class will be structured around a lecture and a case study with a focus on important human rights issues in France. Students will become acquainted with the fundamentals of human rights and will become aware of specific human rights issues that arise in France.

Art History II / From Paris to the Rest of the World: Modern and Post Modern Art (3) – Conducted in English – SPRING

This course is a comparative analysis of artistic concepts, works and movements, important to the distinction between Modernism and Postmodernism in 20th Century Art. It will also study the geopolitical issues of Art. Through an examination of form and content distinguishable in works of various artistic disciplines (painting, sculpture, architecture, design), students will critically evaluate artistic language and expression that is representative of modern and post-modern ideologies. This course will examine the visual arts and will utilize theoretical texts for supportive analysis.

Translation Through the Press (3) – Conducted in English – SPRING

This translation course focuses, for the most part, on material from the Parisian written press. In addition to familiarizing students with some of the techniques of translation in general, the course constitutes a cultural studies approach to France through the press since translating exercises will be accompanied by presentations of the different materials used (newspapers, television, film) and by discussions of the news itself. In addition to acquiring the basic translation skills, students will acquire a vocabulary particular to the press and current events, improve their French-language skills more generally, and view of France by way of its press and the news at a particular historical, political and cultural “moment.” There is no textbook for the course; instead, students will purchase different newspapers and magazines and be provided with links to particular media sites. Partial list of newspapers and magazines: Le Monde, Le Figaro, L’Humanité, Charlie Hebdo, Paris-Match, Libération, Le Parisien, Le Canard enchaîné

TEACHING INTERNSHIP

All students with 4 semesters of college level French (equivalent to the intermediate level) or more are able to participate in the teaching internship for an additional 3 credits. Beginning and intermediate-level students can also do the internship, but are not eligible to earn credit or a grade for the experience. Spaces are limited and are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. An additional fee is charged for the internship.

A French Experience: Internship (3)

Students teach English in a French school. This is a unique experience for API students in Paris to get to know Parisians and Parisian life from the inside, not only through the teenagers in the classes students teach, but also from the teachers that students assist.

TEACHING RESPONSIBILITIES

Students teach English two to three hours a week in a Parisian school. The regular professor asks the student what is to be taught and helps students prepare for class. Students are asked to keep a journal where all course plans and weekly evaluations are registered (one page per class, per course taught). Students also have to write a final internship report (in French) analyzing the French teaching system and their perception of French society through their own teaching experience. Upon successful completion students earn 3 semester credits.