Course Offerings | API Study Abroad
Course Offerings

Highlights

  • Classes are taught in English and French.
  • Orientation in Paris!
  • Triple accreditation: AACSB, AMBA and EQUIS

Requirements

  • Minimum 2.75 G.P.A.
  • Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors (students must be juniors in order to take international business courses)
  • Previous knowledge of French is not required for admission, but it is strongly recommended.
  • All students who are not already fluent in French will take a French class. French courses are offered at all language levels.
  • Completed API application
  • University contact information form
  • Official transcript
  • Program of study statement
  • Applicants must submit the completed API application, one official transcript, and a C.V. or resume.
  • 2 passport sized photos
  • Entry Requirements: Valid passport with student visa
  • 3 short essays covering the following topics:
    • In 500 words or less, students should explain what they would like the GEM admissions board to know about their professional work and/or academic experience.
    • In 500 words or less, students should explain their interest in this particular program, and how they see it helping them to reach their future goals.
    • In 300 words or less, students should discuss what they experienced when they first went abroad or visited a different culture than their own. Students should explain how they overcame the cultural differences.

Dates & Fees

FALL SEMESTER 2017-2018
Sep 3, 2017 - Dec 23, 2017
$17,780
ACADEMIC YEAR 2017-2018
Sep 3, 2017 - Apr 28, 2018
$31,580
SPRING SEMESTER 2018
Jan 4, 2018 - Apr 28, 2018
$17,980
FALL SEMESTER 2018
Early Sep, 2018 - Late Dec, 2018
$17,980
ACADEMIC YEAR 2018-2019
Early Sep, 2018 - Late Apr, 2019
$31,980

Deadlines

FALL SEMESTER 2017-2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
May 15, 2017
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Jul 1, 2017
ACADEMIC YEAR 2017-2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
May 15, 2017
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Jul 1, 2017
SPRING SEMESTER 2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
Oct 15, 2017
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Nov 1, 2017
FALL SEMESTER 2018
APPLICATION DEADLINE
May 15, 2018
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Jul 1, 2018
ACADEMIC YEAR 2018-2019
APPLICATION DEADLINE
May 15, 2018
PAYMENT DEADLINE
Jul 1, 2018

Course Offerings

If you require syllabi that are not listed below, please contact your API Program Manager.

 

All courses are taught in English. French language courses include some instruction in English.

Students should note that there are two tracks, or “Certificates” offered each semester: A Certificate in International Business (CIB) and a Certificate in Business Studies (CBS). The course listings on this page are arranged by semester (term) and certificate (track).

SEMESTER STUDENTS

Semester students will have the opportunity to earn a Certificate in Business Studies (CBS) or a Certificate in International Business (CIB). To enroll in the International Business track and be eligible for the Certificate in Business Studies (CBS), students must have completed 30 U.S. university semester credits; 15 of those credits must have been business or business-related coursework. To enroll in the International Business track and be eligible for the Certificate in International Business (CIB), students must have completed at least 60 U.S. university semester credits; 30 of those credits must have been business or business-related coursework. Each certificate requires a specific sequence of six to seven business classes combined with one language class. Students will earn 15 semester credits. All students who are not fluent in French will take a French class. French courses are offered at all levels. Classes are equivalent to 1.25 or 2.5 semester credits each and class attendance is mandatory.

ACADEMIC YEAR STUDENTS

Academic Year students have the opportunity to earn a Diploma in Business Studies (DBS) a Diploma in International Business (DIB), or a Bachelor’s in International Business (BIB). Students who participate in the DBS program will complete eleven courses in general business studies over the course of the academic year and a French language course each semester. Students who select the DIB or BIB program will complete 10 courses in International Business studies over the course of the academic year and a French language course each semester. To enroll in the DIB track, students must have completed at least 60 U.S. university semester credits, and 30 of those credits must have been business or business-related coursework. To enroll in the BIB track, students must have completed at least 60 U.S. university semester credits, and 45 of those credits must have been business or business-related coursework. Students who complete the BIB program will be awarded a bachelor’s degree from GEM upon successful completion of all required courses—an incredible asset for any student hoping to work abroad in the future!

SPRING CLASSES:

SPECIALIZATION CERTIFICATES IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

THIS CERTIFICATE PROGRAM IS FOR STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED AT LEAST 60 U.S. SEMESTER CREDITS AND AT LEAST 30 U.S. SEMESTER CREDITS IN BUSINESS OR BUSINESS RELATED COURSEWORK.

Students will choose a certificate track (Global Management, Finance & Accounting, Marketing & Advertising, or Fashion & Design), from which they will take 5-7 general business courses and one French course.

French Language – Levels 1-5 (2.5) – Conducted in French AND English

Topics include grammar, structure and vocabulary; written and oral comprehension; writing, reading and listening skills; and French culture. Students are required to attend language lab outside of regular class time each week to practice speaking and listening skills.

Capstone Module (2.5) – Conducted in English

Course description currently unavailable.

SPECIALIZATIONS (10)

In addition to the French course and Capstone Module, students select a specialty track, and take all courses within that track. The available tracks are: Global Management, Finance & Accounting, Marketing & Advertising, Fashion & Design, and Entrepreneurship. Students will receive a certificate for the track upon completion of the semester.

Global Management Track

Prerequisite for this track – a background in corporate finance.

International Finance (2.5) – Conducted in English

The international financial environment is increasingly complex. Multinational firms, as compared to purely domestic ones have greater opportunities in terms of diversification, scale economies, and larger cost effective financing sources. On the other hand, they also face greater risks: political instability, exchange rate fluctuations, and complex fiscal regulations. Because multinationality is an increasing feature of modern business, managers of firms (be they international or domestic) must have some of the knowledge and skills required by multinational business. The rapidly increasing integration of capital markets renders this even more imperative. This course is, therefore, intended to expose students to the concepts, techniques and instruments of international financial management.

European Business Environment (2.5) – Conducted in English

The International Business in the European Union module focuses on the complex European business environment, European integration in general and current issues facing all Europeans. It is designed for those who are new to European studies and so gives an introduction to the history and institution of the EU and the business impact of the main treaties, but also includes in later sessions material that focuses on current economic and political issues in the EU. For example: Is the euro a success? Should the EU expand further? How complete is the single market?

This course provides an essential basic understanding of Europe and can facilitate the career objectives for non-Europeans planning to work in Europe or for those who intend to develop professional links between non-European and European organizations, for example trade relations. The course also provides a basic understanding of key factors in managing business activity in the EU.

Contemporary International Issues (1.25) – Conducted in English

The course focuses on issues, debates, and forces that shape our world today. Even if it deals with geopolitical issues, it is not intended as an advanced course in international relations per se. It is rather a theme-centred, multi-disciplinary forum to ponder some of the most complex, and controversial issues shaping our contemporary globalized world. As we cannot deal with every single important issue, it will be more relevant to focus on the following topics, for their interest and contemporaneity: 1) Terrorism: A Historical Perspective; 2) Corruption, Governance, and International Politics; 3) NGOs, National Sovereignty, and the Right of Humanitarian Intervention; 4) Religion in International Relations; 5) Globalization and Cultural Exceptionalism in the Middle East; 6) Business Ethics: Fad or Necessity?

Business Development in Emerging Economies (1.25) – Conducted in English

Emerging markets such as Brazil, Russia, India, China, Mexico and South Africa as well as a whole array of South East Asian economies are becoming of key importance for global business operations. They offer already low cost sources of production, global sourcing of resources and new market opportunities. They are also becoming a key source of future competition to European and U.S. businesses. This course examines the key features and growth of emerging economies and the strategies that businesses may take to benefit from these changes.

Course objectives:

  • To understand the process of globalization
  • To provide an understanding of the importance of emerging market economies for contemporary international businesses
  • To develop a critical understanding of key aspects of the business environment of emerging economies
  • To develop the ability to formulate strategies for doing business in emerging economies.
International Business Law (2.5) – Conducted in English

This course will closely examine the legal aspects of the three basic forms of international business: trade, licensing of intellectual property, and foreign direct investment – within the context of managerial decision making. The course will explain fundamental principles of public and private international law, as well as the law of the European Union, as they relate to the regulation of trade, licensing of intellectual property, and direct investment. The course will: convey basic knowledge of the law of the contracts for the sale of goods as embodied in the Convention for International Sale of Goods in a comparative perspective with other legal systems and principles concerning the subject matter; offer a comparative approach to the study of business law and of legal systems so as to understand how legal problems are treated in different societal and cultural environments; and develop the student’s awareness of the special legal problems facing multinational corporations that are trading, licensing and investing in foreign countries.

Finance & Accounting Track

Prerequisite for this track – a background in corporate finance and financial accounting.

International Finance (2.5) – Conducted in English

The international financial environment is increasingly complex. Multinational firms, as compared to purely domestic ones have greater opportunities in terms of diversification, scale economies, and larger cost effective financing sources. On the other hand, they also face greater risks: political instability, exchange rate fluctuations, and complex fiscal regulations. Because multinationality is an increasing feature of modern business, managers of firms (be they international or domestic) must have some of the knowledge and skills required by multinational business. The rapidly increasing integration of capital markets renders this even more imperative. This course is, therefore, intended to expose students to the concepts, techniques and instruments of international financial management.

Financial Markets and Instruments (2.5) – Conducted in English

Financial markets are an important part of modern day economies. They play three major roles. They serve as the means of mobilising financial resources for potentially profitable investment projects; they facilitate financial transactions and ensure that the interests of the participants are safeguarded. It is, therefore, important and useful, for students in Finance to be familiar with organization and functioning. This course will enable the student to:

  • Understand the functions, roles and organisation of banking systems and financial markets
  • Know the different principal instruments and products used in financial transactions
  • Understand how financial securities are issued and traded
  • Master the basic methods and techniques of evaluating financial securities and products
Financial Statement Analysis (1.25) – Conducted in English

This course is aimed at providing the student with the necessary skills and knowledge required to understand and use accounting and financial information in the management of the financial resources of the firm. By the end of the course, the student should be able to:

  • Grasp the importance and major intricacies of accounting and financial information within an international framework
  • Appraise the value and limits of accounting and financial information
  • Master how to analyse accounting and financial information
  • Understand the purpose and usefulness of accounting standards
  • Analyze financial statements based on measures of profitability, capital structure, efficiency and liquidity
  • Measure and determine the financial performance of the firm.
  • Integrate the shortcomings of analyses based on accounting information
Budgeting and Reporting (1.25) – Conducted in English

Budgeting and reporting are essential for the efficient management of the firm. The purpose of this course is to explain why and how budgeting and reporting should play a key role in the management process. On finishing this course, the student will have the necessary knowledge and tools for the understanding of:

  • The budgetary process (preparing budgets, performing and collecting information on actual performance, responding to variances between planned and actual performance and exercising control).
  • Measuring shareholder value as well as non-financial performances.
International Business Law (2.5) – Conducted in English

This course will closely examine the legal aspects of the three basic forms of international business: trade, licensing of intellectual property, and foreign direct investment – within the context of managerial decision making. The course will explain fundamental principles of public and private international law, as well as the law of the European Union, as they relate to the regulation of trade, licensing of intellectual property, and direct investment. The course will: convey basic knowledge of the law of the contracts for the sale of goods as embodied in the Convention for International Sale of Goods in a comparative perspective with other legal systems and principles concerning the subject matter; offer a comparative approach to the study of business law and of legal systems so as to understand how legal problems are treated in different societal and cultural environments; and develop the student’s awareness of the special legal problems facing multinational corporations that are trading, licensing and investing in foreign countries.

Marketing & Advertising Track

Prerequisite for this track – a background in the principles of marketing and international marketing.

International Advertising and Public Relations (1.25) – Conducted in English

This course will take an in-depth look at how announcers use the English language to attract, inform and persuade consumers, by means of positive or negative connotations and associations, in a conscious effort to influence behavior and attitudes towards certain products and services. This course will also examine the fundamental elements of a press release. Using critical analysis, comparison and creative narration effects, students will become familiar with the skills required to target an audience, captivate a reader, embellish facts and maximize market exposure. By the end of this course students will have acquired comprehensive knowledge about how companies shape their credibility, build their brand equity and control their advertising message.

Brand Management (2.5) – Conducted in English

The brand management module deals with

  • Brand management in general
  • Interactive marketing
  • Luxury brand management

At the end of this module, students will be able to:

  • Identify the world’s most successful brands and explore the reasons behind their successes
  • Develop a critical understanding of the factors involved in building and maintaining a brand
  • Critically assess the contemporary issues in brand management
  • Evaluate how marketing and creative industries can work together in managing brands
  • Identify and understand the marketing strategies of brands
  • Examine leading innovative and creative brands
  • Critically assess brand identity theories including marketing, design, techniques, prototypes and production
  • Critically assess practices of store design, retail methods and visual merchandising
Digital Marketing (2.5) – Conducted in English

The World Wide Web is the fastest growing communications medium in history, expanding far more rapidly that the introduction of other mass media such as print, radio, TV and cinema. It impacts on organizations in 3 ways: It is in some areas replacing traditional communication channels, in others providing alternative channels which need to be aligned to existing ones. It also offers completely new ways of communicating with employees, supply chain partners, existing and potential customers. The medium is becoming pervasive – present in places, processes and contexts that far exceed previous media penetration and impact. At the same time it has been disruptive, changing markets, businesses and customer relations.

This requires potential managers to objectively assess the effectiveness of a corporate web presence, understand the relevance and applicability of existing and digital business models, and make strategic recommendations for ongoing improvements not just in web site design but in communications strategy and objectives in an increasingly digital business and social environment. The module will:

  • Allow students to critically input in to the planning and strategy of an effective company web presence
  • Understand company business objective and revenue models as critical to creating an effective company web presence
  • Objectively and critically analyze the characteristics of an effective company web presence as a communication channel
  • Understand basic Internet terminology and technologies for corporate communication
  • Introduce web site usability testing and methods
  • Understand key theories, design concepts and business models for web based business communication
Sports Marketing & Events Management (2.5) – Conducted in English

Students will discover the three facets of sports marketing in three business contexts : sports marketing in a sport-show professional club, sports marketing in a sport-practice club, and sports marketing in a sporting goods manufacturer. Reading the textbook before class is compulsory (will be controlled).

Sustainable Marketing (1.25) – Conducted in English

Sustainable development is a major trend of contemporary marketing. Consumers, governments and companies are more and more aware of the long term benefits of reasoned marketing campaigns. This module will investigate how communication can take advantage of this new context, instead of being harmed.

Definitions, advantages and pitfalls will be studied through recent examples in the various contexts of sustainable marketing such as:

  • Societal marketing
  • Ecology & green marketing
  • Socially Responsible Marketing
  • Cause marketing and charity marketing
  • Corporate crisis communication
  • Ethics of marketing and communication

In this module, students will discover:

  • The diversity of sustainable marketing and its rich possibilities
  • To diagnose and criticize a marketing strategy from the sustainable marketing point of view
  • How to implement a marketing-communication campaign in the various contexts of sustainable development
Fashion & Design Track

Prerequisite for this track – a background in the principles of marketing, international marketing, and operations and supply chain management.

Fashion Management (includes supply chain in fashion management) (30 hours per week) – Conducted in English

This course will address creative principles of fashion, including supply chain management.

Brand Management (2.5) – Conducted in English

The brand management module deals with

  • Brand management in general
  • Interactive marketing
  • Luxury brand management

At the end of this module, students will be able to:

  • Identify the world’s most successful brands and explore the reasons behind their successes
  • Develop a critical understanding of the factors involved in building and maintaining a brand
  • Critically assess the contemporary issues in brand management
  • Evaluate how marketing and creative industries can work together in managing brands
  • Identify and understand the marketing strategies of brands
  • Examine leading innovative and creative brands
  • Critically assess brand identity theories including marketing, design, techniques, prototypes and production
  • Critically assess practices of store design, retail methods and visual merchandising
Sustainable Development in the Fashion and Design Industry (1.25) – Conducted in English

This course will address sustainability in the fashion industry with a special focus on sustainable luxury, and innovation in sustainability.

Design Management (1.25) – Conducted in English

Products and services attract their clients for various reasons. Functionality, price, ergonomics, symbolic value, brand identity and aesthetics are all important issues for product appeal. Design influences these aspects, while working in line with the company’s strategy. Good design stands out, delivers innovative improvements in products and services, is vital for companies and has, depending on the company’s objective, the potential to deliver more eco-friendly solutions. Ultimately this comes down to innovation through a user-focused design process:

In this course on product innovation, we will study these aspects from the viewpoint of a business student by analysing the following themes:

  • Understanding the value of design for a company by studying various design cases and design-oriented companies
  • Understanding the design process and the basics of design management
  • Obtaining knowledge of design movements and design history
  • Creating awareness of design’s vital impact design on business results
  • Obtaining knowledge of design best practices
  • Creating basic understanding about the integration of design in a company situation
  • Recognizing the link between the creative design approach and creative management
Legal Context of Fashion& Design Industry (1.25) – Conducted in English

Course description currently unavailable.

Retail Management (1.25) – Conducted in English

Retail Managers are in charge of implementing a retail brand’s commercial policies with the ultimate aim of maximizing profit, while at the same time, reducing costs. Retail Management covers many fields of business management including Human Resources, Operations Management, Supply Chain Management and Information Technologies. The retail management course will therefore cover only areas of Retail Management that are not covered in other foundation modules of the program. The course will distinguish itself from these areas to focus on the following topics as specifically applied to the Fashion and Design industry:

  • Managing and motivating sales teams in a retail environment
  • Monitoring the market and taking initiatives to off-set competitor activities
  • Point of sale & store merchandizing and planography
  • Retail events management & promotions
Entrepreneurship Track

Prerequisite for this track – Corporate Finance and Entrepreneurship.

Business Planning (2.5) – Conducted in English

Entrepreneurship is the process by which individuals pursue opportunities without regard to resources they currently control. The essence of entrepreneurial behaviour is identifying business opportunities and putting them into practice. In order to attract the attention of external resource stakeholders, entrepreneurs need to demonstrate their capacity to reach critical milestones of the new venture creation process. One of the first milestones of any new business start-up is proof of concept, which will help to reassure the project leaders and potential investors about the viability of the project. As such, to succeed in new venture creation, it is not enough just to discover brilliant new opportunities: Enterprising individuals also need to work on those ideas to transform them into reality. This module has been developed to meet the needs of entrepreneurial individuals who want to garner the attention of outside stakeholders for further acceleration of the emergence of their new business.

Topics covered in the lectures

  • Team and team dynamics
  • Project risks and issues
  • Opportunity, vision, strategy
  • Markets
  • Financial needs and other needs
Entrepreneurial in Hi-Tech Sector (1.25) – Conducted in English

Technology has become ubiquitous in modern society. For every industrialized nation, the technology sector represents a significant portion of the economy. Also, note how smartphones, personal computers, tablets, and the Internet have integrated into everyday commerce and our personal lives. It is clear that national and global economic growth depends on the health and contributions of high-technology ventures. High-technology ventures refer to information technology enterprises, biotechnology and medical businesses, energy and sustainability companies, and those service firms where technology is critical to their missions. These high-technology ventures exploit breakthrough advancements in science and engineering to develop better products and services, which are often a source of competitive advantage.

High-technology entrepreneurship concerns “a style of business leadership that involves identifying high-potential, technology-intensive commercial opportunities, gathering resources such as talent and capital, and managing rapid growth and significant risks using principled decision-making skills”. The leaders of technology ventures demonstrate focus, passion, and an unrelenting will to succeed. Well-known examples of high-technology ventures include Intel, which was formed to apply semiconductor technology to the design and manufacture of semiconductor circuits, and Microsoft to create and distribute computer software products for applications in industry and the home.

How to found and grow successful high-technology ventures? This course is guided by this fundamental question. Through a collection of lectures, projects and case studies that cover high- technology ventures, this course is organized into three topics. In the first topic, we discuss how changes in the structure of technological and consumer markets create opportunities for new value creation. The focuses are the mechanisms that underlie technology S-curves and product diffusion curves. In the second part, special attention is devoted to profiting from technologies.

Students will need to understand that economic value is almost always created through the coordinated action of a group of firms, and they should appreciate different means to capture value from technology-based innovations. Finally, we address challenges surrounding the commercialization of high-technology innovations, including university-sourced science and engineering research.

Entrepreneurial Opportunities (2.5) – Conducted in English

One of the most exciting and satisfying activities in business is to start a new venture. The essence of entrepreneurial behavior is identifying innovative ideas, transforming them into business opportunities, and putting them into practice no matter whether you are working inside an existing company or starting a totally new business. Entrepreneurship is the process by which individuals pursue opportunities without regard to resources they currently control. In this module participants will focus on transforming innovative ideas into business opportunities. That is, participants will learn how to identify innovative ideas and in the very first steps should validate innovative ideas before actually committing a lot of resources for the preparation of a comprehensive business plan. For entrepreneurs a combination of analytical and imaginary thinking is important, for example in the phase of need finding and the following idea development. Design thinking will be part of this module to help students finding a clear problem zone, identify their client and start the idea development phase.

Entrepreneurial Finance (2.5) – Conducted in English

Finance is a key, and often scarce, resource for new businesses. Entrepreneurs face financial issues such as determining if and when their business is expected to be profitable, how much financing is needed and when, what are the potential financing sources and how to acquire them. Yet many entrepreneurs lack financial competences.

While mainstream corporate finance is mostly directed at mature public companies, entrepreneurial finance addresses the specific challenges faced by young ventures: high uncertainty, negative initial cash flows, limited access to debt and to public financial markets. This module aims to introduce students to entrepreneurial finance with a focus on the preparation and implementation of the acquisition of financial resources for new innovative businesses.

Topics covered:

  • Actors in entrepreneurial finance
  • Preparing financial projections
  • Valuing a young venture
  • Funding process, negotiations and mechanics of equity openings
  • Managing and financing growth
Sustainable and Social Entrepreneurship (1.25) – Conducted in English

Social problems (homeless, unemployment, poverty, illiteracy, etc.) and sustainability challenges (fresh water supply, biodiversity, degradation, deforestation, food) represent some of the most significant societal challenges of the century. This module focuses on exploring businesses opportunities in sustainability and social issues.

SPRING CLASSES:

CERTIFICATE IN BUSINESS STUDIES (CBS)

THIS PROGRAM IS FOR STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED AT LEAST 30 U.S. SEMESTER CREDITS AND AT LEAST 15 U.S. SEMESTER CREDITS IN BUSINESS OR BUSINESS-RELATED COURSEWORK.

The following six classes are required.

French Language – Levels 1-5 (2.5) – Conducted in French and English

Topics include grammar, structure and vocabulary; written and oral comprehension; writing, reading and listening skills; and French culture. Students are required to attend language lab outside of regular class time each week to practice speaking and listening skills.

Introduction to Human Resource Management (2.5) – Conducted in English

People are at the heart of organizations and are often one of the most important resources available to management. To understand the management of human resources and the factors that shape this process this course examines Human Resource Management (HRM) and the context of HRM from a comparative perspective using examples from across the European Union.

Market Research (2.5) – Conducted in English

In an increasingly fluid & rapidly changing international market place, organizations need to be able to gain an effective understanding of the current & future needs of the market place and behavioral factors that influence them. Organizations need to be able to swiftly, cost effectively & accurately assess these needs to assist their strategists & marketing planners in effective decision making on what markets to target & what products/services to offer to them. By developing an understanding of the core issues of consumer behavior (an understanding of how consumer psychological processes interact with both social and situational influences to shape consumer perceptions, decision making processes and behavior) and how through marketing research, these behaviors can be studied, understood & learned from, students will develop an understanding of the importance of these topics, how to apply them in a commercial environment & their place within the broader marketing & strategic planning framework.

Corporate Finance (2.5) – Conducted in English

This is a course in corporate finance covering capital budgeting techniques and financial statement analysis.

Geopolitics (2.5) – Conducted in English

This class invites students from different backgrounds and cultures to ponder the origins of western political thought and covers topics like international relations, political systems, and culture. It will be in the form of an introductory survey of fundamental issues in political thought, international relations, and the interaction among politics, the economy, geography and culture. It will also explore North-South relations in the new context of globalization, the international division of labor and its consequences on relations among nations. The course will also study themes such as culture, religion and the so-called clash of civilizations. Part I: Political systems (3 weeks) Part II: International Relations, 1945-1989 (5 weeks) Part III: International relations in the post-cold war period (4 weeks).

Introduction to Negotiation (1.25) – Conducted in English

The International Negotiation course aims at enabling participants to understand the basic principles of negotiation and their dynamics, to develop their own negotiation skills, practice and become a better negotiator. The main topics that will be covered are: introduction to negotiation; styles and types of negotiation; negotiation main concepts; negotiating in groups; win-win negotiations; communication and negotiation; international negotiation.

French Society (1.25) – Conducted in English

Course description currently unavailable.

FALL CLASSES:

CERTIFICATE IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (CIB)

THIS PROGRAM IS FOR STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED AT LEAST 60 U.S. SEMESTER CREDITS AND AT LEAST 30 U.S. SEMESTER CREDITS IN BUSINESS OR BUSINESS-RELATED COURSEWORK.

The following six classes are required.

French Language – Levels 1-5 (2.5) – Conducted in French and English

Topics include grammar, structure and vocabulary; written and oral comprehension; writing, reading and listening skills; and French culture. Students are required to attend language lab outside of regular class time each week to practice speaking and listening skills.

Intercultural Business Skills (1.25) – Conducted in English

In order to operate successfully in today’s increasingly complex global marketplace, international managers are required to possess greater awareness, sensitivity and flexibility in dealing with intercultural issues. This course enables students to: demonstrate awareness of one’s own culture, its limitations and its assumptions; display understanding of the nature and significance of cultural similarities and differences, and how they manifest themselves in a work environment; and apply the skills of adaptability, empathy, effective communication (including active listening), situational analysis and emotional intelligence to real-life managerial situations encountered in the workplace.

Entrepreneurship (1.25) – Conducted in English

The course explores the various forms of entrepreneurship, such as international entrepreneurship, corporate entrepreneurship and family entrepreneurship. It compares and contrasts the skills and roles of entrepreneurs, and analyses the different approaches for organizational change and transformation through entrepreneurship. As part of the course, students will explore how ideas for new business ventures can be generated and screened, analyse the processes necessary to start a new venture through rigorous business planning, before examining what makes some ventures succeed and others fail.

Innovation Management (2.5) – Conducted in English

Products and services attract their clients for various strong reasons. Functionality, price, ergonomics, symbolic value, brand identity and aesthetics are all important issues for product appeal. Design influences these aspects, while working in line with the company’s strategy. Good design stands out, increases sales and is vital for companies in a competitive field. Good design means the right innovation and good business results. In this course on product innovation, we concentrate on the design of products and packagings and the reasons for product attachment. We will study this from the viewpoint of a business student by analyzing the following themes: Understanding the value of design for a company by studying different design cases and design-oriented companies; Understanding the design process and the basics of design management; Obtaining knowledge of design movements and design history.

International Marketing (2.5) – Conducted in English

This module will examine the global aspects of marketing and students will learn to apply the basic concepts, practices and principles of marketing in an international context. The course will cover: the international marketing environment; the specificities of international marketing: increased complexity of the environment (economy, history and geography, cultures, politics, legal environment); the international marketing triad: segmenting, targeting and positioning in an international context; global competitive analysis and strategy; international market selection; international market entry strategies and expansion; understanding licensing, investment, and strategic alliances; global branding decisions; the 4 Ps in an international context, international product decisions, international pricing, international distribution, global communication strategies; implementing an international marketing plan and control.

Introduction to Global Strategy (2.5) – Conducted in English

This course focuses on organizational strategy and managing for sustained competitive advantage. It is based on the premise that companies can become and remain successful if managers have an appropriate vision and plan for running the organization, and if they carry out the plan proficiently. The course examines how strategic management relates to organizational performance. You will learn skills that you can use to strategically analyze organizations. The course integrates functional theories (production, human resources, marketing, finance, accounting) of business. It will teach you how organizations respond to environmental changes and competitive challenges at global and local levels, as they try to improve their performance.

Ethical Dimensions of International Business (2.5) – Conducted in English

In the contemporary setting of globalized business managers increasingly find themselves having to face ethically based criticisms and to grapple with ethical dilemmas. The importance of ethical conduct in business has been brought sharply into focus by a series of high profile business scandals such as that of ENRON and more recently by certain moral aspects of the financial crash of autumn 2008. This module aims to develop the students awareness of the ethical issues which can confront an international and/or multicultural business and their ability to analyse these and deal with them in a critically informed manner. A variety of prespectives from Western and Eastern philosophies and wisdoms will be brought to bear on the issues. The appropriate scope of Company Social Responsibility and the most effective manner of its implementation are studied through some practical cases.

FALL CLASSES:

CERTIFICATE IN BUSINESS STUDIES (CBS)

THIS PROGRAM IS FOR STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED AT LEAST 30 U.S. SEMESTER CREDITS AND AT LEAST 15 U.S. SEMESTER CREDITS IN BUSINESS OR BUSINESS-RELATED COURSEWORK.

The following seven classes are required.

French Language – Levels 1-5 (2.5) – Conducted in French and English

REQUIRED Topics include grammar, structure and vocabulary; written and oral comprehension; writing, reading and listening skills; and French culture. Students are required to attend language lab outside of regular class time each week to practice speaking and listening skills.

Purchasing (1.25) – Conducted in English

The following themes will be part of the “Purchasing” course: 1) Introduction of General economy/ company trends. Outsourcing and consequences. Rising of Procurement & Purchasing within the context of Outsourcing/ Selection of Suppliers tools (Reverse Marketing); 2) The importance of Reverse marketing for the professional buyer (Marketing B2B, Purchasing segmentation); 3) Internal analysis (Need definition & buying center stakeholders, internal constraints evaluation, definition of purchasing levers, supplier pre-selection criteria); 4) External analysis (offer & demand analysis, techno /market watch); 5) Confrontation of internal & external analysis for sourcing strategy elaboration.

Introduction to Technology Management (1.25) – Conducted in English

Technological changes have strongly influenced society and companies in the 20th century. Students following business studies should, therefore, be aware of the business opportunities created by scientific and technological innovations.

Sales Management (1.25) – Conducted in English

The objectives of this course are to develop an understanding of the main concepts related to sales and selling. To be a good seller, one has to be able to understand the buyer’s needs, constraints, and priorities. This module should help participants to: take an appointment; prepare a customer meeting; give a first good impression; listen to the customer; present a proposal that fits the customer’s needs; answer customer’s objections; close the deal; and build a long term relationship.

Managerial and Financial Accounting (2.5) – Conducted in English

This course introduces both the techniques used to prepare financial statements and those used to support the management process of planning, control, and decision making. This course is composed of two components, financial accounting and product costing and managerial accounting. In the first component, students will be introduced to the principles and concepts used to prepare the basic financial statements. This includes the ‘how’ and ‘why’ of recording financial transactions, the accounting cycle, the double-entry bookkeeping principle, and the underlying records. The second component introduces the fundamentals of product costing, cost behavior, and costing systems and analysis.

Consumer Behavior (2.5) – Conducted in English

Students in this course will gain an understanding of the key concepts of consumer behavior, and how through marketing research, this behavior, once understood, impacts marketing decision making, helping organizations become more customer focused, and marketing oriented.

Economics (Micro and Macro Economics) (2.5) – Conducted in English

In this course students will use the tools and concepts of economics (microeconomics and macroeconomics) to investigate the organizational problems with which managers contend. Course content includes: the firm: definition, typology; general introduction to managerial economics, micro and macro economics; understanding markets; how to analyze a country; supply and demand; market efficiency; macroeconomic objectives; macroeconomic policies; international regulations and policies. Although very few economists are actually working within companies, managers require a sound understanding of what elements are important to take into consideration for a firm in a global environment.

Operations & Supply Chain Management (1.25) – Conducted in English

Course description currently unavailable.